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Evaluation of vegetation communities, water table, and peat composition as drivers of greenhouse gas emissions in lowland tropical peatlands.
Sci Total Environ. 2019 Oct 20; 688:1193-1204.ST

Abstract

Tropical peatlands are globally important source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, but data on carbon fluxes from these ecosystems is limited due to the logistical challenges of measuring gas fluxes in these ecosystems. Proposals to overcome the difficulties of measuring gas carbon fluxes in the tropics include remote sensing (top-down) approaches. However, these require information on the effect of vegetation communities on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes from the peat surface (bottom-up). Such information will help reducing the uncertainty in current carbon budgets and resolve inconsistencies between the top-down and bottom-up estimates of gas fluxes from tropical peatlands. We investigated temporal and spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes from tropical peatlands inhabited by two contrasting vegetation communities (i.e., mixed forest and palm swamp) in Panama. In addition, we explored the influence of peat chemistry and nutrient status (i.e., factorial nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) addition) on greenhouse gas fluxes from the peat surface. We found that: i) CO2 and CH4 fluxes were not significantly different between the two vegetation communities, but did vary temporally across an annual cycle; ii) precipitation rates and peat temperature were poor predictors of CO2 and CH4 fluxes; iii) nitrogen addition increased CH4 fluxes at the mixed forests when the water table was above the peat surface, but neither nitrogen nor phosphorus affected gas fluxes elsewhere; iv) gas fluxes varied significantly with the water table level, with CO2 flux being 80% greater at low water table, and CH4 fluxes being 81% higher with the water table above the surface. Taken together, our data suggested that water table is the most important control of greenhouse gas emissions from the peat surface in forested lowland tropical peatlands, and that neither the presence of distinct vegetation communities nor the addition of nutrients outweigh such control.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The University of Nottingham, School of Biosciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK. Electronic address: jhoyosantillan@gmail.com.The University of Nottingham, School of Biosciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK.The University of Nottingham, Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancon, Panama.Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Servicios de Alta Tecnología (INDICASAT), Centro de Biodiversidad y Descubrimiento de Drogas Clayton, Panama.University of Leicester, Department of Geography, Leicester LE1 7RH, UK.University of Magallanes, Department of Sciences and Natural Resources, Punta Arenas, Chile.The University of Nottingham, School of Biosciences, Sutton Bonington Campus, Loughborough LE12 5RD, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31726550

Citation

Hoyos-Santillan, Jorge, et al. "Evaluation of Vegetation Communities, Water Table, and Peat Composition as Drivers of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Lowland Tropical Peatlands." The Science of the Total Environment, vol. 688, 2019, pp. 1193-1204.
Hoyos-Santillan J, Lomax BH, Large D, et al. Evaluation of vegetation communities, water table, and peat composition as drivers of greenhouse gas emissions in lowland tropical peatlands. Sci Total Environ. 2019;688:1193-1204.
Hoyos-Santillan, J., Lomax, B. H., Large, D., Turner, B. L., Lopez, O. R., Boom, A., Sepulveda-Jauregui, A., & Sjögersten, S. (2019). Evaluation of vegetation communities, water table, and peat composition as drivers of greenhouse gas emissions in lowland tropical peatlands. The Science of the Total Environment, 688, 1193-1204. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2019.06.366
Hoyos-Santillan J, et al. Evaluation of Vegetation Communities, Water Table, and Peat Composition as Drivers of Greenhouse Gas Emissions in Lowland Tropical Peatlands. Sci Total Environ. 2019 Oct 20;688:1193-1204. PubMed PMID: 31726550.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Evaluation of vegetation communities, water table, and peat composition as drivers of greenhouse gas emissions in lowland tropical peatlands. AU - Hoyos-Santillan,Jorge, AU - Lomax,Barry H, AU - Large,David, AU - Turner,Benjamin L, AU - Lopez,Omar R, AU - Boom,Arnoud, AU - Sepulveda-Jauregui,Armando, AU - Sjögersten,Sofie, Y1 - 2019/06/24/ PY - 2019/03/30/received PY - 2019/06/19/revised PY - 2019/06/22/accepted PY - 2019/11/16/entrez PY - 2019/11/16/pubmed PY - 2019/11/16/medline KW - Campnosperma KW - Methane KW - Nitrogen KW - Phosphorus KW - Pyrolysis KW - Raphia SP - 1193 EP - 1204 JF - The Science of the total environment JO - Sci. Total Environ. VL - 688 N2 - Tropical peatlands are globally important source of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, but data on carbon fluxes from these ecosystems is limited due to the logistical challenges of measuring gas fluxes in these ecosystems. Proposals to overcome the difficulties of measuring gas carbon fluxes in the tropics include remote sensing (top-down) approaches. However, these require information on the effect of vegetation communities on carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes from the peat surface (bottom-up). Such information will help reducing the uncertainty in current carbon budgets and resolve inconsistencies between the top-down and bottom-up estimates of gas fluxes from tropical peatlands. We investigated temporal and spatial variability of CO2 and CH4 fluxes from tropical peatlands inhabited by two contrasting vegetation communities (i.e., mixed forest and palm swamp) in Panama. In addition, we explored the influence of peat chemistry and nutrient status (i.e., factorial nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) addition) on greenhouse gas fluxes from the peat surface. We found that: i) CO2 and CH4 fluxes were not significantly different between the two vegetation communities, but did vary temporally across an annual cycle; ii) precipitation rates and peat temperature were poor predictors of CO2 and CH4 fluxes; iii) nitrogen addition increased CH4 fluxes at the mixed forests when the water table was above the peat surface, but neither nitrogen nor phosphorus affected gas fluxes elsewhere; iv) gas fluxes varied significantly with the water table level, with CO2 flux being 80% greater at low water table, and CH4 fluxes being 81% higher with the water table above the surface. Taken together, our data suggested that water table is the most important control of greenhouse gas emissions from the peat surface in forested lowland tropical peatlands, and that neither the presence of distinct vegetation communities nor the addition of nutrients outweigh such control. SN - 1879-1026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31726550/Evaluation_of_vegetation_communities_water_table_and_peat_composition_as_drivers_of_greenhouse_gas_emissions_in_lowland_tropical_peatlands_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0048-9697(19)32939-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -