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CSF or serum neurofilament light added to α-Synuclein panel discriminates Parkinson's from controls.
Mov Disord. 2020 02; 35(2):288-295.MD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Neurofilament light chain is a marker of axonal damage and is of interest as a biofluid biomarker for PD. The objective of this study was to investigate whether CSF or serum neurofilament contributes to a combination of CSF biomarkers in defining the optimal biomarker panel for discriminating PD patients from healthy controls. In addition, we aimed to assess whether CSF and/or serum neurofilament levels are associated with clinical measures of disease severity.

METHODS

We measured neurofilament light chain levels in CSF and/or serum of 139 PD patients and 52 age-matched healthy controls. We used stepwise logistic regression analyses to test whether neurofilament contributes to a biomarker CSF panel including total, oligomeric, and phosphorylated α-synuclein and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. Measures of disease severity included disease duration, UPDRS-III, Hoehn & Yahr stage, and MMSE.

RESULTS

After correcting for age, CSF neurofilament levels were 42% higher in PD patients compared with controls (P < 0.01), whereas serum neurofilament levels were 37% higher (P = 0.08). Combining CSF neurofilament, phosphorylated-/total α-synuclein, and oligomeric-/total α-synuclein yielded the best-fitting model for discriminating PD patients from controls (area under the curve 0.92). The discriminatory potential of serum neurofilament in the CSF biomarker panel was similar (area under the curve 0.90). Higher serum neurofilament was associated with a lower MMSE score. There were no other associations between CSF and/or serum neurofilament levels and clinical disease severity.

CONCLUSIONS

CSF neurofilament contributes to a panel of CSF α-synuclein species in differentiating PD patients from healthy controls. Serum neurofilament may have added value to a biofluid biomarker panel for differentiating PD patients from controls. © 2019 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Section Clinical Anatomy and Biobanking, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.Department of Clinical Chemistry, Neurochemistry Laboratory, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.Neurological Disorders Research Center, Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI), Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU), Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar.Neurological Disorders Research Center, Qatar Biomedical Research Institute (QBRI), Hamad Bin Khalifa University (HBKU), Qatar Foundation, Doha, Qatar.Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Department of Neurology, OLVG, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.Department of Neurology, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.Department of Clinical Chemistry, Neurochemistry Laboratory, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.Department of Anatomy and Neurosciences, Section Clinical Anatomy and Biobanking, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31737952

Citation

Oosterveld, Linda P., et al. "CSF or Serum Neurofilament Light Added to α-Synuclein Panel Discriminates Parkinson's From Controls." Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, vol. 35, no. 2, 2020, pp. 288-295.
Oosterveld LP, Verberk IMW, Majbour NK, et al. CSF or serum neurofilament light added to α-Synuclein panel discriminates Parkinson's from controls. Mov Disord. 2020;35(2):288-295.
Oosterveld, L. P., Verberk, I. M. W., Majbour, N. K., El-Agnaf, O. M., Weinstein, H. C., Berendse, H. W., Teunissen, C. E., & van de Berg, W. D. J. (2020). CSF or serum neurofilament light added to α-Synuclein panel discriminates Parkinson's from controls. Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society, 35(2), 288-295. https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27897
Oosterveld LP, et al. CSF or Serum Neurofilament Light Added to α-Synuclein Panel Discriminates Parkinson's From Controls. Mov Disord. 2020;35(2):288-295. PubMed PMID: 31737952.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - CSF or serum neurofilament light added to α-Synuclein panel discriminates Parkinson's from controls. AU - Oosterveld,Linda P, AU - Verberk,Inge M W, AU - Majbour,Nour K, AU - El-Agnaf,Omar M, AU - Weinstein,Henry C, AU - Berendse,Henk W, AU - Teunissen,Charlotte E, AU - van de Berg,Wilma D J, Y1 - 2019/11/18/ PY - 2019/07/19/received PY - 2019/09/23/revised PY - 2019/10/10/accepted PY - 2019/11/19/pubmed PY - 2021/1/16/medline PY - 2019/11/19/entrez KW - CSF biomarkers KW - Parkinson's disease KW - neurofilament light KW - serum biomarkers SP - 288 EP - 295 JF - Movement disorders : official journal of the Movement Disorder Society JO - Mov Disord VL - 35 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Neurofilament light chain is a marker of axonal damage and is of interest as a biofluid biomarker for PD. The objective of this study was to investigate whether CSF or serum neurofilament contributes to a combination of CSF biomarkers in defining the optimal biomarker panel for discriminating PD patients from healthy controls. In addition, we aimed to assess whether CSF and/or serum neurofilament levels are associated with clinical measures of disease severity. METHODS: We measured neurofilament light chain levels in CSF and/or serum of 139 PD patients and 52 age-matched healthy controls. We used stepwise logistic regression analyses to test whether neurofilament contributes to a biomarker CSF panel including total, oligomeric, and phosphorylated α-synuclein and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. Measures of disease severity included disease duration, UPDRS-III, Hoehn & Yahr stage, and MMSE. RESULTS: After correcting for age, CSF neurofilament levels were 42% higher in PD patients compared with controls (P < 0.01), whereas serum neurofilament levels were 37% higher (P = 0.08). Combining CSF neurofilament, phosphorylated-/total α-synuclein, and oligomeric-/total α-synuclein yielded the best-fitting model for discriminating PD patients from controls (area under the curve 0.92). The discriminatory potential of serum neurofilament in the CSF biomarker panel was similar (area under the curve 0.90). Higher serum neurofilament was associated with a lower MMSE score. There were no other associations between CSF and/or serum neurofilament levels and clinical disease severity. CONCLUSIONS: CSF neurofilament contributes to a panel of CSF α-synuclein species in differentiating PD patients from healthy controls. Serum neurofilament may have added value to a biofluid biomarker panel for differentiating PD patients from controls. © 2019 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. SN - 1531-8257 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31737952/CSF_or_serum_neurofilament_light_added_to_α_Synuclein_panel_discriminates_Parkinson's_from_controls_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mds.27897 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -