Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Adults.
Ann Nutr Metab. 2019; 75(3):168-178.AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIMS

Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its metabolic components, the common risk factors, may be involved in the development and progression of decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The aim of this study was to examine the association of MetS and its metabolic components with eGFR status and severity among Chinese adults.

METHODS

The population-based, cross-sectional study recruited a total of 33,300 Chinese adults (aged ≥18 years) from 4 study community sites in Songjiang District, Shanghai, between June 2016 and December 2017. Decreased eGFR was defined as a value of eGFR below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Weighted multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association of MetS and its components with eGFR status and severity.

RESULTS

After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects with MetS had an increased risk of decreased eGFR with an adjusted OR of 1.76 (95% CI 1.53-2.01), and subjects with increasing numbers of MetS components had a gradually increased risk for decreased eGFR (p trend <0.001). The multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of decreased eGFR were 1.66 (1.44-1.93) for abdominal obesity, 1.37 (1.18-1.60) for elevated triglycerides, 1.13 (0.96-1.33) for reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 0.84 (0.72-0.98) for elevated fasting glucose, and 1.92 (1.57-2.35) for elevated blood pressure (BP). Furthermore, these associations remained in most of the subgroups analyses. Significant associations between elevated BP and the risks of mildly, moderately, and severely decreased eGFR were also found.

CONCLUSIONS

MetS was independently associated with an increased risk of decreased eGFR, and individual components of MetS each play a different role in decreased eGFR. Elevated BP may be an important risk factor for the progression of renal dysfunction or even chronic kidney disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Songjiang District Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Songjiang District Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai, China.Songjiang District Center for Disease Prevention and Control, Shanghai, China.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Key Laboratory of Public Health Safety of Ministry of Education, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, gmzhao@shmu.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31739307

Citation

Qiu, Yun, et al. "Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components With Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Adults." Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 75, no. 3, 2019, pp. 168-178.
Qiu Y, Zhao Q, Gu Y, et al. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Adults. Ann Nutr Metab. 2019;75(3):168-178.
Qiu, Y., Zhao, Q., Gu, Y., Wang, N., Yu, Y., Wang, R., Zhang, Y., Zhu, M., Liu, X., Jiang, Y., & Zhao, G. (2019). Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Adults. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 75(3), 168-178. https://doi.org/10.1159/000504356
Qiu Y, et al. Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components With Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Adults. Ann Nutr Metab. 2019;75(3):168-178. PubMed PMID: 31739307.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components with Decreased Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate in Adults. AU - Qiu,Yun, AU - Zhao,Qi, AU - Gu,Yian, AU - Wang,Na, AU - Yu,Yuting, AU - Wang,Ruiping, AU - Zhang,Yue, AU - Zhu,Meiying, AU - Liu,Xing, AU - Jiang,Yonggen, AU - Zhao,Genming, Y1 - 2019/11/18/ PY - 2019/06/12/received PY - 2019/10/25/accepted PY - 2019/11/19/pubmed PY - 2020/4/18/medline PY - 2019/11/19/entrez KW - Chronic kidney disease KW - Estimated glomerular filtration rate KW - Metabolic syndrome KW - Renal function decline SP - 168 EP - 178 JF - Annals of nutrition & metabolism JO - Ann Nutr Metab VL - 75 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND/AIMS: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its metabolic components, the common risk factors, may be involved in the development and progression of decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). The aim of this study was to examine the association of MetS and its metabolic components with eGFR status and severity among Chinese adults. METHODS: The population-based, cross-sectional study recruited a total of 33,300 Chinese adults (aged ≥18 years) from 4 study community sites in Songjiang District, Shanghai, between June 2016 and December 2017. Decreased eGFR was defined as a value of eGFR below 60 mL/min/1.73 m2. Weighted multiple logistic regression models were used to examine the association of MetS and its components with eGFR status and severity. RESULTS: After adjusting for potential confounders, subjects with MetS had an increased risk of decreased eGFR with an adjusted OR of 1.76 (95% CI 1.53-2.01), and subjects with increasing numbers of MetS components had a gradually increased risk for decreased eGFR (p trend <0.001). The multivariable-adjusted ORs (95% CI) of decreased eGFR were 1.66 (1.44-1.93) for abdominal obesity, 1.37 (1.18-1.60) for elevated triglycerides, 1.13 (0.96-1.33) for reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, 0.84 (0.72-0.98) for elevated fasting glucose, and 1.92 (1.57-2.35) for elevated blood pressure (BP). Furthermore, these associations remained in most of the subgroups analyses. Significant associations between elevated BP and the risks of mildly, moderately, and severely decreased eGFR were also found. CONCLUSIONS: MetS was independently associated with an increased risk of decreased eGFR, and individual components of MetS each play a different role in decreased eGFR. Elevated BP may be an important risk factor for the progression of renal dysfunction or even chronic kidney disease. SN - 1421-9697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31739307/Association_of_Metabolic_Syndrome_and_Its_Components_with_Decreased_Estimated_Glomerular_Filtration_Rate_in_Adults_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000504356 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -