Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Target blood pressure and control status in Asia.

Abstract

It is widely accepted that hypertension constitutes a significant cardiovascular risk factor and that treating high blood pressure (BP) effectively reduces cardiovascular risk. An important issue in Asia is not just the high prevalence of hypertension, particularly in some countries, but also the low level of awareness and treatment rates in many regions. The 2017 update of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association hypertension guidelines raised the question about which BP threshold should be used to diagnose and treat hypertension. Although there is a theoretical rationale for a stricter BP criterion in Asia given the ethnic-specific features of hypertension in the region, the majority of countries in Asia have retained a diagnostic BP threshold of ≥140/90 mm Hg. Although lowering thresholds might make theoretical sense, this would increase the prevalence of hypertension and also markedly reduce BP control rates. In addition, there are currently no data from robust randomized clinical trials of the benefits of the lower targets in preventing cardiovascular disease and reducing cardiovascular risk, particularly in high-risk patients and especially for Asian populations. There is also no defined home BP treatment target level for an office BP treatment target of 130/80 mm Hg. However, in this regard, in the interim, lifestyle modifications, including reducing body weight and salt intake, should form an important part of hypertension management strategies in Asia, while studies on treating at lower BP threshold level in Asians and getting to lower BP targets will be helpful to inform and optimize the management of hypertension in the region.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Sciences, School of Healthcare and Medical Sciences, Sunway University, Bandar Sunway, Malaysia. Department of Primary Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Tochigi, Japan.Department of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Atma Jaya Catholic University of Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia.University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center Inc, Quezon City, Philippines.Department of General Medicine, Tan Tock Seng Hospital, Singapore City, Singapore.Fatima Memorial Hospital, Lahore, Pakistan.Division of Cardiology, Cardiovascular Hospital, Yonsei Health System, Seoul, Korea.Faculty of Cardiology Service, Hanyang University Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan.University of the East Ramon Magsaysay Memorial Medical Center Inc, Quezon City, Philippines.Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical University School of Medicine, Tochigi, Japan.Department of Internal Medicine, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Hue University, Hue, Vietnam.Department of Medicine, Medical Center Manila, Manila, Philippines.Department Cardiology and Vascular Medicine, University of Indonesia-National Cardiovascular Center, Harapan Kita, Jakarta, Indonesia.MIOT International Hospital, Chennai, India. College of Medical Sciences, Kathmandu University, Bharatpur, Nepal.Bangkok Hospital Chiang Mai, Chiang Mai, Thailand.Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore City, Singapore.Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, India.Divisions of Hypertension and Heart Failure, Fu Wai Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.Division of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and College of Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan.Department of Hypertension, Centre for Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials, The Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31742891

Citation

Chia, Yook-Chin, et al. "Target Blood Pressure and Control Status in Asia." Journal of Clinical Hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.), 2019.
Chia YC, Kario K, Turana Y, et al. Target blood pressure and control status in Asia. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2019.
Chia, Y. C., Kario, K., Turana, Y., Nailes, J., Tay, J. C., Siddique, S., ... Wang, J. G. (2019). Target blood pressure and control status in Asia. Journal of Clinical Hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.), doi:10.1111/jch.13714.
Chia YC, et al. Target Blood Pressure and Control Status in Asia. J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich). 2019 Nov 19; PubMed PMID: 31742891.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Target blood pressure and control status in Asia. AU - Chia,Yook-Chin, AU - Kario,Kazuomi, AU - Turana,Yuda, AU - Nailes,Jennifer, AU - Tay,Jam Chin, AU - Siddique,Saulat, AU - Park,Sungha, AU - Shin,Jinho, AU - Buranakitjaroen,Peera, AU - Chen,Chen-Huan, AU - Divinagracia,Romeo, AU - Hoshide,Satoshi, AU - Minh,Huynh Van, AU - Sison,Jorge, AU - Soenarta,Arieska Ann, AU - Sogunuru,Guru Prasad, AU - Sukonthasarn,Apichard, AU - Teo,Boon Wee, AU - Verma,Narsingh, AU - Zhang,Yuqing, AU - Wang,Tzung-Dau, AU - Wang,Ji-Guang, Y1 - 2019/11/19/ PY - 2019/08/31/received PY - 2019/09/10/accepted PY - 2019/11/20/entrez KW - Asia KW - HOPE Asia Network KW - control blood pressure KW - home blood pressure (HBPM) KW - target blood pressure JF - Journal of clinical hypertension (Greenwich, Conn.) JO - J Clin Hypertens (Greenwich) N2 - It is widely accepted that hypertension constitutes a significant cardiovascular risk factor and that treating high blood pressure (BP) effectively reduces cardiovascular risk. An important issue in Asia is not just the high prevalence of hypertension, particularly in some countries, but also the low level of awareness and treatment rates in many regions. The 2017 update of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association hypertension guidelines raised the question about which BP threshold should be used to diagnose and treat hypertension. Although there is a theoretical rationale for a stricter BP criterion in Asia given the ethnic-specific features of hypertension in the region, the majority of countries in Asia have retained a diagnostic BP threshold of ≥140/90 mm Hg. Although lowering thresholds might make theoretical sense, this would increase the prevalence of hypertension and also markedly reduce BP control rates. In addition, there are currently no data from robust randomized clinical trials of the benefits of the lower targets in preventing cardiovascular disease and reducing cardiovascular risk, particularly in high-risk patients and especially for Asian populations. There is also no defined home BP treatment target level for an office BP treatment target of 130/80 mm Hg. However, in this regard, in the interim, lifestyle modifications, including reducing body weight and salt intake, should form an important part of hypertension management strategies in Asia, while studies on treating at lower BP threshold level in Asians and getting to lower BP targets will be helpful to inform and optimize the management of hypertension in the region. SN - 1751-7176 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31742891/Target_blood_pressure_and_control_status_in_Asia L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/jch.13714 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -