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Higher Levels of Streptococcus in Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosa Associated with Symptoms in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia.
Digestion. 2020; 101(1):38-45.D

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Functional dyspepsia (FD) is associated with poor health-related quality of life. Recent evidence suggests that the main pathogenesis suspect is the gut mucosa-associated microbiota (MAM). However, little is known about the MAM in FD subjects. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between upper gastrointestinal symptoms in FD and the characteristics of the gastrointestinal MAM.

SUMMARY

Five mucosa samples from the upper gut (intraoral, mid-esophagus, gastric body, gastric antrum, and descending portion of the duodenum) were collected with a brush under endoscopic examination from FD and healthy control subjects. MAM profiles of each sample were analyzed by 16S-rRNA -V3-V4 gene sequences. Questionnaire was used to assess gastrointestinal symptoms in FD. Between FD and healthy control subjects, although the comparison of MAM α-diversity showed no significant differences, the structure of MAM (β-diversity) was clearly different. Only the phylum Firmicutes was increased in FD compared to healthy control subjects in all sites of the upper gut. At the genus level, Streptococcus was significantly increased in all sites in the upper gut in FD. The relative abundance of Streptococcus was positively correlated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in each upper gut group. Furthermore, the relative abundance of OTU 90 was positively correlated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in all sites in the upper gut in FD. Key Messages: Streptococcus is a bacterium strongly correlated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in FD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gastroenterology, North Medical Center Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan, takatomo@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp. Department for Medical Innovation and Translational Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan, takatomo@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Laboratory of Animal Science, Department of Agriculture and Life Science, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Gastroenterology, Akashi City Hospital, Akashi, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Gastroenterology, Fukuchiyama City Hospital, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Gastroenterology, North Medical Center Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Gastroenterology, North Medical Center Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Gastroenterology, North Medical Center Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kawasaki Medical School, Okayama, Japan.Department of Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.Department for Medical Innovation and Translational Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. Department of Neurology, North Medical Center Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31752012

Citation

Fukui, Akifumi, et al. "Higher Levels of Streptococcus in Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosa Associated With Symptoms in Patients With Functional Dyspepsia." Digestion, vol. 101, no. 1, 2020, pp. 38-45.
Fukui A, Takagi T, Naito Y, et al. Higher Levels of Streptococcus in Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosa Associated with Symptoms in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia. Digestion. 2020;101(1):38-45.
Fukui, A., Takagi, T., Naito, Y., Inoue, R., Kashiwagi, S., Mizushima, K., Inada, Y., Inoue, K., Harusato, A., Dohi, O., Okayama, T., Katada, K., Kamada, K., Uchiyama, K., Ishikawa, T., Handa, O., Itoh, Y., & Nakagawa, M. (2020). Higher Levels of Streptococcus in Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosa Associated with Symptoms in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia. Digestion, 101(1), 38-45. https://doi.org/10.1159/000504090
Fukui A, et al. Higher Levels of Streptococcus in Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosa Associated With Symptoms in Patients With Functional Dyspepsia. Digestion. 2020;101(1):38-45. PubMed PMID: 31752012.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Higher Levels of Streptococcus in Upper Gastrointestinal Mucosa Associated with Symptoms in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia. AU - Fukui,Akifumi, AU - Takagi,Tomohisa, AU - Naito,Yuji, AU - Inoue,Ryo, AU - Kashiwagi,Saori, AU - Mizushima,Katsura, AU - Inada,Yutaka, AU - Inoue,Ken, AU - Harusato,Akihito, AU - Dohi,Osamu, AU - Okayama,Tetsuya, AU - Katada,Kazuhiro, AU - Kamada,Kazuhiro, AU - Uchiyama,Kazuhiko, AU - Ishikawa,Takeshi, AU - Handa,Osamu, AU - Itoh,Yoshito, AU - Nakagawa,Masanori, Y1 - 2019/11/21/ PY - 2019/10/11/received PY - 2019/10/11/accepted PY - 2019/11/22/pubmed PY - 2020/8/7/medline PY - 2019/11/22/entrez KW - Functional dyspepsia KW - Mucosa-associated microbiota KW - Streptococcus SP - 38 EP - 45 JF - Digestion JO - Digestion VL - 101 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Functional dyspepsia (FD) is associated with poor health-related quality of life. Recent evidence suggests that the main pathogenesis suspect is the gut mucosa-associated microbiota (MAM). However, little is known about the MAM in FD subjects. The aim of this study was to clarify the relationship between upper gastrointestinal symptoms in FD and the characteristics of the gastrointestinal MAM. SUMMARY: Five mucosa samples from the upper gut (intraoral, mid-esophagus, gastric body, gastric antrum, and descending portion of the duodenum) were collected with a brush under endoscopic examination from FD and healthy control subjects. MAM profiles of each sample were analyzed by 16S-rRNA -V3-V4 gene sequences. Questionnaire was used to assess gastrointestinal symptoms in FD. Between FD and healthy control subjects, although the comparison of MAM α-diversity showed no significant differences, the structure of MAM (β-diversity) was clearly different. Only the phylum Firmicutes was increased in FD compared to healthy control subjects in all sites of the upper gut. At the genus level, Streptococcus was significantly increased in all sites in the upper gut in FD. The relative abundance of Streptococcus was positively correlated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in each upper gut group. Furthermore, the relative abundance of OTU 90 was positively correlated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in all sites in the upper gut in FD. Key Messages: Streptococcus is a bacterium strongly correlated with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in FD. SN - 1421-9867 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31752012/Higher_Levels_of_Streptococcus_in_Upper_Gastrointestinal_Mucosa_Associated_with_Symptoms_in_Patients_with_Functional_Dyspepsia_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000504090 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -