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Sugary Drink Consumption Among Children by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Status.
Am J Prev Med. 2020 01; 58(1):69-78.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program is the largest U.S. federally funded nutrition assistance program, providing food assistance to more than 40 million low-income Americans, half of whom are children. This paper examines trends in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among U.S. children and adolescents by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation status.

METHODS

Dietary data from 15,645 participants (aged 2-19 years) were obtained from the 2003-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination surveys. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation was categorized as: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participant, income-eligible nonparticipant, lower income-ineligible nonparticipant, and higher income-ineligible nonparticipant. Survey-weighted logistic regressions estimated predicted probabilities of daily sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and negative binomial regressions estimated predicted per capita daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage calories. Data were analyzed in 2019.

RESULTS

From 2003 to 2014, there were significant declines across all Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation categories for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (participants: 84.2% to 75.6%, p=0.009; income-eligible nonparticipants: 85.8% to 67.5%, p=0.004; lower income-ineligible nonparticipants: 84.3% to 70.6%, p=0.026; higher income-ineligible nonparticipants: 82.2% to 67.7%, p=0.001) and per capita daily sugar-sweetened beverage calories (participants: 267 to 182 kilocalories, p<0.001; income-eligible nonparticipants: 269 to 168 kilocalories, p<0.001; lower income-ineligible nonparticipants: 249 to 178 kilocalories, p=0.008; higher income-ineligible nonparticipants: 244 to 161 kilocalories, p<0.001). Per capita sports/energy drink consumption increased among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants (2 to 15 kilocalories, p=0.007).

CONCLUSIONS

Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has declined for children and adolescents in all Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation categories, but current levels remain high. There were fewer favorable trends over time for consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage subtypes among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants relative to other participant categories.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Washington, District of Columbia, Independent Researcher. Electronic address: komawyatt@gmail.com.Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Health Policy and Management, University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.Department of Health Policy and Management, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31761517

Citation

Koma, J Wyatt, et al. "Sugary Drink Consumption Among Children By Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Status." American Journal of Preventive Medicine, vol. 58, no. 1, 2020, pp. 69-78.
Koma JW, Vercammen KA, Jarlenski MP, et al. Sugary Drink Consumption Among Children by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Status. Am J Prev Med. 2020;58(1):69-78.
Koma, J. W., Vercammen, K. A., Jarlenski, M. P., Frelier, J. M., & Bleich, S. N. (2020). Sugary Drink Consumption Among Children by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Status. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 58(1), 69-78. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amepre.2019.08.033
Koma JW, et al. Sugary Drink Consumption Among Children By Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Status. Am J Prev Med. 2020;58(1):69-78. PubMed PMID: 31761517.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sugary Drink Consumption Among Children by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Status. AU - Koma,J Wyatt, AU - Vercammen,Kelsey A, AU - Jarlenski,Marian P, AU - Frelier,Johannah M, AU - Bleich,Sara N, Y1 - 2019/11/21/ PY - 2019/05/03/received PY - 2019/08/21/revised PY - 2019/08/22/accepted PY - 2019/11/26/pubmed PY - 2020/11/3/medline PY - 2019/11/26/entrez SP - 69 EP - 78 JF - American journal of preventive medicine JO - Am J Prev Med VL - 58 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program is the largest U.S. federally funded nutrition assistance program, providing food assistance to more than 40 million low-income Americans, half of whom are children. This paper examines trends in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among U.S. children and adolescents by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation status. METHODS: Dietary data from 15,645 participants (aged 2-19 years) were obtained from the 2003-2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination surveys. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation was categorized as: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participant, income-eligible nonparticipant, lower income-ineligible nonparticipant, and higher income-ineligible nonparticipant. Survey-weighted logistic regressions estimated predicted probabilities of daily sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and negative binomial regressions estimated predicted per capita daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage calories. Data were analyzed in 2019. RESULTS: From 2003 to 2014, there were significant declines across all Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation categories for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (participants: 84.2% to 75.6%, p=0.009; income-eligible nonparticipants: 85.8% to 67.5%, p=0.004; lower income-ineligible nonparticipants: 84.3% to 70.6%, p=0.026; higher income-ineligible nonparticipants: 82.2% to 67.7%, p=0.001) and per capita daily sugar-sweetened beverage calories (participants: 267 to 182 kilocalories, p<0.001; income-eligible nonparticipants: 269 to 168 kilocalories, p<0.001; lower income-ineligible nonparticipants: 249 to 178 kilocalories, p=0.008; higher income-ineligible nonparticipants: 244 to 161 kilocalories, p<0.001). Per capita sports/energy drink consumption increased among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants (2 to 15 kilocalories, p=0.007). CONCLUSIONS: Sugar-sweetened beverage consumption has declined for children and adolescents in all Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation categories, but current levels remain high. There were fewer favorable trends over time for consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage subtypes among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants relative to other participant categories. SN - 1873-2607 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31761517/Sugary_Drink_Consumption_Among_Children_by_Supplemental_Nutrition_Assistance_Program_Status_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0749-3797(19)30390-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -