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The use of anthropometry to assess nutritional status.
World Health Stat Q. 1988; 41(2):48-58.WH

Abstract

Anthropometry (the use of body measurements to assess nutritional status) is a practical and immediately applicable technique for assessing children's development patterns during the first years of life. An evaluation of their growth also provides useful insights into the nutrition and health situation of entire population groups. Anthropometric indicators are less accurate than clinical and biochemical techniques when it comes to assessing individual nutritional status. In many field situations where resources are severely limited, however, anthropometry can be used as a screening device to identify individuals at risk of undernutrition, followed by a more elaborate investigation using other techniques. Similarly, growth monitoring permits the detection of individuals with faltering growth, who can then be appropriately referred to specialized care. Thanks to the standardization that has taken place in recent years, changes in trends over time with respect to the nutritional situation can be evaluated in countries where national food and nutrition surveillance systems have been developed, or where nationally representative cross-sectional surveys have been conducted some years apart using identical, or nearly identical, methodologies. Although data that can be used to evaluate trends are limited, some insight can be gained into the nutritional situation and changes occurring over time in a number of countries. Prevalence figures for underweight (low weight-for-age) have been prepared using standard methods of data collection, analysis and presentation, for several countries in Africa, the Americas and Asia. As such, they fail to differentiate between wasting and stunting, or to evaluate differences between age groups. Also, they do not necessarily reflect trends in other countries in the same or other regions. Still, it is interesting, if not statistically significant, that there has been a general improvement in the nutritional status of preschool children. Intercountry trend comparisons are difficult for two main reasons. Firstly, the time between surveys is occasionally different and, secondly, despite efforts to standardize data analysis and presentation, different cut-off points have been used to calculate prevalence figures and estimate the extent of undernutrition. However, the use of identical cut-off points is not essential for making intercountry trend analyses since it is the general trends in growth deficit and nutritional status over time which are being evaluated.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Family Health, World Health Organization, Geneva.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

3176514

Citation

Gorstein, J, and J Akré. "The Use of Anthropometry to Assess Nutritional Status." World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, vol. 41, no. 2, 1988, pp. 48-58.
Gorstein J, Akré J. The use of anthropometry to assess nutritional status. World Health Stat Q. 1988;41(2):48-58.
Gorstein, J., & Akré, J. (1988). The use of anthropometry to assess nutritional status. World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel De Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales, 41(2), 48-58.
Gorstein J, Akré J. The Use of Anthropometry to Assess Nutritional Status. World Health Stat Q. 1988;41(2):48-58. PubMed PMID: 3176514.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The use of anthropometry to assess nutritional status. AU - Gorstein,J, AU - Akré,J, PY - 1988/1/1/pubmed PY - 1988/1/1/medline PY - 1988/1/1/entrez KW - Africa KW - Anthropometry KW - Asia KW - Biology KW - Body Weight KW - Child Development KW - Child Nutrition--changes KW - Data Analysis KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Epidemiologic Methods KW - Growth KW - Health KW - Latin America KW - Malnutrition KW - Measurement KW - Nutrition Disorders KW - Nutrition--changes KW - Oceania KW - Physiology KW - Prevalence KW - Research Methodology SP - 48 EP - 58 JF - World health statistics quarterly. Rapport trimestriel de statistiques sanitaires mondiales JO - World Health Stat Q VL - 41 IS - 2 N2 - Anthropometry (the use of body measurements to assess nutritional status) is a practical and immediately applicable technique for assessing children's development patterns during the first years of life. An evaluation of their growth also provides useful insights into the nutrition and health situation of entire population groups. Anthropometric indicators are less accurate than clinical and biochemical techniques when it comes to assessing individual nutritional status. In many field situations where resources are severely limited, however, anthropometry can be used as a screening device to identify individuals at risk of undernutrition, followed by a more elaborate investigation using other techniques. Similarly, growth monitoring permits the detection of individuals with faltering growth, who can then be appropriately referred to specialized care. Thanks to the standardization that has taken place in recent years, changes in trends over time with respect to the nutritional situation can be evaluated in countries where national food and nutrition surveillance systems have been developed, or where nationally representative cross-sectional surveys have been conducted some years apart using identical, or nearly identical, methodologies. Although data that can be used to evaluate trends are limited, some insight can be gained into the nutritional situation and changes occurring over time in a number of countries. Prevalence figures for underweight (low weight-for-age) have been prepared using standard methods of data collection, analysis and presentation, for several countries in Africa, the Americas and Asia. As such, they fail to differentiate between wasting and stunting, or to evaluate differences between age groups. Also, they do not necessarily reflect trends in other countries in the same or other regions. Still, it is interesting, if not statistically significant, that there has been a general improvement in the nutritional status of preschool children. Intercountry trend comparisons are difficult for two main reasons. Firstly, the time between surveys is occasionally different and, secondly, despite efforts to standardize data analysis and presentation, different cut-off points have been used to calculate prevalence figures and estimate the extent of undernutrition. However, the use of identical cut-off points is not essential for making intercountry trend analyses since it is the general trends in growth deficit and nutritional status over time which are being evaluated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) SN - 0379-8070 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/3176514/The_use_of_anthropometry_to_assess_nutritional_status_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -