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Differences in associations between problematic video-gaming, video-gaming duration, and weapon-related and physically violent behaviors in adolescents.
J Psychiatr Res. 2020 02; 121:47-55.JP

Abstract

Seemingly mixed findings have been reported on possible relationships between video-gaming and violent or aggressive behaviors. Given the prevalence of gaming in adolescents and potential harms associated with violent behaviors, relationships between problematic gaming, gaming engagement, and risk behaviors involving weapons and physical violence require further research. This study examined in a large sample of high-school students the relationships between problem-gaming severity, gaming duration, and violence-related measures including weapon-carrying, having been threatened by someone with a weapon, perceived insecurity, physical fights and serious fights leading to injuries. Potential moderation by sensation-seeking and impulsivity was also tested. Participants were 3,896 Connecticut high-school adolescents. Chi-square, logistic regression, and moderation models were conducted. Adolescents with at-risk/problem gaming, compared to low-risk and non-gaming adolescents, reported more weapon-carrying, having been threatened with weapons, feeling unsafe at school, and serious fighting leading to injury. Among those reporting gaming, weekly time spent gaming was associated with problem-gaming severity. Those with longer (versus shorter) gaming durations were more likely to report weapon-carrying and feeling unsafe at school. Sensation-seeking moderated associations between at-risk/problem gaming and weapon-carrying frequency. Associations between gaming quantity and problem-gaming severity and measures of weapon-carrying and physical violence in adolescents suggest that understanding further their mechanistic relationships may be important in promoting safer developmental trajectories for youth. Future longitudinal studies may provide important insight into the etiologies underlying these relationships and such information may help develop more effective prevention and intervention strategies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT, 05753, United States. Electronic address: zuweiz@middlebury.edu.Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06510, United States. Electronic address: rani.desai@yale.edu.Department of Psychology, Middlebury College, Middlebury, VT, 05753, United States. Electronic address: jhowell@middlebury.edu.Problem Gambling Services, Middletown, CT, 06457, United States. Electronic address: Jeremy.Wampler@ct.gov.Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06510, United States. Electronic address: suchitra.krishnan-sarin@yale.edu.Department of Psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06510, United States; The Connecticut Council on Problem Gambling, Wethersfield, CT, 06109, United States; The Connecticut Mental Health Center, New Haven, CT, 06519, United States; Department of Neuroscience and Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06510, United States. Electronic address: marc.potenza@yale.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31765836

Citation

Zhai, Zu Wei, et al. "Differences in Associations Between Problematic Video-gaming, Video-gaming Duration, and Weapon-related and Physically Violent Behaviors in Adolescents." Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 121, 2020, pp. 47-55.
Zhai ZW, Hoff RA, Howell JC, et al. Differences in associations between problematic video-gaming, video-gaming duration, and weapon-related and physically violent behaviors in adolescents. J Psychiatr Res. 2020;121:47-55.
Zhai, Z. W., Hoff, R. A., Howell, J. C., Wampler, J., Krishnan-Sarin, S., & Potenza, M. N. (2020). Differences in associations between problematic video-gaming, video-gaming duration, and weapon-related and physically violent behaviors in adolescents. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 121, 47-55. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpsychires.2019.11.005
Zhai ZW, et al. Differences in Associations Between Problematic Video-gaming, Video-gaming Duration, and Weapon-related and Physically Violent Behaviors in Adolescents. J Psychiatr Res. 2020;121:47-55. PubMed PMID: 31765836.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Differences in associations between problematic video-gaming, video-gaming duration, and weapon-related and physically violent behaviors in adolescents. AU - Zhai,Zu Wei, AU - Hoff,Rani A, AU - Howell,Jordan C, AU - Wampler,Jeremy, AU - Krishnan-Sarin,Suchitra, AU - Potenza,Marc N, Y1 - 2019/11/14/ PY - 2019/08/30/received PY - 2019/11/01/revised PY - 2019/11/13/accepted PY - 2019/11/26/pubmed PY - 2021/3/25/medline PY - 2019/11/26/entrez KW - Adolescent KW - High school KW - Injury KW - Video gaming KW - Violence KW - Weapon carrying SP - 47 EP - 55 JF - Journal of psychiatric research JO - J Psychiatr Res VL - 121 N2 - Seemingly mixed findings have been reported on possible relationships between video-gaming and violent or aggressive behaviors. Given the prevalence of gaming in adolescents and potential harms associated with violent behaviors, relationships between problematic gaming, gaming engagement, and risk behaviors involving weapons and physical violence require further research. This study examined in a large sample of high-school students the relationships between problem-gaming severity, gaming duration, and violence-related measures including weapon-carrying, having been threatened by someone with a weapon, perceived insecurity, physical fights and serious fights leading to injuries. Potential moderation by sensation-seeking and impulsivity was also tested. Participants were 3,896 Connecticut high-school adolescents. Chi-square, logistic regression, and moderation models were conducted. Adolescents with at-risk/problem gaming, compared to low-risk and non-gaming adolescents, reported more weapon-carrying, having been threatened with weapons, feeling unsafe at school, and serious fighting leading to injury. Among those reporting gaming, weekly time spent gaming was associated with problem-gaming severity. Those with longer (versus shorter) gaming durations were more likely to report weapon-carrying and feeling unsafe at school. Sensation-seeking moderated associations between at-risk/problem gaming and weapon-carrying frequency. Associations between gaming quantity and problem-gaming severity and measures of weapon-carrying and physical violence in adolescents suggest that understanding further their mechanistic relationships may be important in promoting safer developmental trajectories for youth. Future longitudinal studies may provide important insight into the etiologies underlying these relationships and such information may help develop more effective prevention and intervention strategies. SN - 1879-1379 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31765836/Differences_in_associations_between_problematic_video_gaming_video_gaming_duration_and_weapon_related_and_physically_violent_behaviors_in_adolescents_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -