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A test strip platform based on a whole-cell microbial biosensor for simultaneous on-site detection of total inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics without the need for predigestion.
Biosens Bioelectron 2020; 150:111899BB

Abstract

Mercury pollutants such as mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2) and mercuric ammonium chloride (Hg(NH2)Cl) are often found in cosmetics. Previous attempts at the on-site detection of mercury were hindered by the complicated and dangerous pretreatment procedure of converting various forms of mercury to Hg (II) ions. In this study, a test strip platform was developed based on a whole-cell microbial biosensor for the simultaneous detection of soluble and insoluble inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics without the need for predigestion. The genetic circuits with constitutively expressed MerR as sensor proteins and inducible red fluorescent protein (RFP) as the reporter were introduced into Escherichia coli to construct the mercury detection biosensor. The RFP fluorescence intensity of this biosensor showed a excellent linear relationship (R2 = 0.9848) with the Hg (II) concentration ranging from 50 nM to 10 μM in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth. Further research indicated that this biosensor could respond not only to Hg (II) ions but also to insoluble Hg2Cl2 and Hg2Cl2. The transcriptomic results confirmed the mercury conversion ability of the whole-cell biosensor from a gene expression perspective. This biosensor was embedded on filter paper to form a test strip, which could be used to determine whether the total inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics exceeded 1 mg/kg. Therefore, this strip provided a low cost, easy-to-use, and instrument-independent method for the detection of mercury pollution in cosmetics, while this study revealed the unique advantages of microbial biosensors in the automatic bioconversion of targets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China; Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China; Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China; Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China; Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China.Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Food Nutrition and Human Health, College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100083, China; Key Laboratory of Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Organism (Food Safety), Ministry of Agriculture, Beijing, 100083, China. Electronic address: xuwentao@cau.edu.cn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31767350

Citation

Guo, Mingzhang, et al. "A Test Strip Platform Based On a Whole-cell Microbial Biosensor for Simultaneous On-site Detection of Total Inorganic Mercury Pollutants in Cosmetics Without the Need for Predigestion." Biosensors & Bioelectronics, vol. 150, 2020, p. 111899.
Guo M, Wang J, Du R, et al. A test strip platform based on a whole-cell microbial biosensor for simultaneous on-site detection of total inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics without the need for predigestion. Biosens Bioelectron. 2020;150:111899.
Guo, M., Wang, J., Du, R., Liu, Y., Chi, J., He, X., ... Xu, W. (2020). A test strip platform based on a whole-cell microbial biosensor for simultaneous on-site detection of total inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics without the need for predigestion. Biosensors & Bioelectronics, 150, p. 111899. doi:10.1016/j.bios.2019.111899.
Guo M, et al. A Test Strip Platform Based On a Whole-cell Microbial Biosensor for Simultaneous On-site Detection of Total Inorganic Mercury Pollutants in Cosmetics Without the Need for Predigestion. Biosens Bioelectron. 2020 Feb 15;150:111899. PubMed PMID: 31767350.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A test strip platform based on a whole-cell microbial biosensor for simultaneous on-site detection of total inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics without the need for predigestion. AU - Guo,Mingzhang, AU - Wang,Jili, AU - Du,Ruoxi, AU - Liu,Yanger, AU - Chi,Jiani, AU - He,Xiaoyun, AU - Huang,Kunlun, AU - Luo,Yunbo, AU - Xu,Wentao, Y1 - 2019/11/18/ PY - 2019/09/15/received PY - 2019/11/05/revised PY - 2019/11/14/accepted PY - 2019/11/27/pubmed PY - 2019/11/27/medline PY - 2019/11/27/entrez KW - Mercury KW - On-site detection KW - Test strip KW - Whole cell biosensor SP - 111899 EP - 111899 JF - Biosensors & bioelectronics JO - Biosens Bioelectron VL - 150 N2 - Mercury pollutants such as mercuric chloride (HgCl2), mercurous chloride (Hg2Cl2) and mercuric ammonium chloride (Hg(NH2)Cl) are often found in cosmetics. Previous attempts at the on-site detection of mercury were hindered by the complicated and dangerous pretreatment procedure of converting various forms of mercury to Hg (II) ions. In this study, a test strip platform was developed based on a whole-cell microbial biosensor for the simultaneous detection of soluble and insoluble inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics without the need for predigestion. The genetic circuits with constitutively expressed MerR as sensor proteins and inducible red fluorescent protein (RFP) as the reporter were introduced into Escherichia coli to construct the mercury detection biosensor. The RFP fluorescence intensity of this biosensor showed a excellent linear relationship (R2 = 0.9848) with the Hg (II) concentration ranging from 50 nM to 10 μM in Luria-Bertani (LB) broth. Further research indicated that this biosensor could respond not only to Hg (II) ions but also to insoluble Hg2Cl2 and Hg2Cl2. The transcriptomic results confirmed the mercury conversion ability of the whole-cell biosensor from a gene expression perspective. This biosensor was embedded on filter paper to form a test strip, which could be used to determine whether the total inorganic mercury pollutants in cosmetics exceeded 1 mg/kg. Therefore, this strip provided a low cost, easy-to-use, and instrument-independent method for the detection of mercury pollution in cosmetics, while this study revealed the unique advantages of microbial biosensors in the automatic bioconversion of targets. SN - 1873-4235 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31767350/A_test_strip_platform_based_on_a_whole-cell_microbial_biosensor_for_simultaneous_on-site_detection_of_total_inorganic_mercury_pollutants_in_cosmetics_without_the_need_for_predigestion L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0956-5663(19)30978-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -