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Predictable events elicit less visual and temporal information uptake in an oddball paradigm.

Abstract

In the visual oddball paradigm, surprising inputs can seem expanded in time relative to unsurprising repeated events. A horizontal input embedded in a train of successive vertical inputs can, for instance, seem relatively protracted in time, even if all inputs are presented for an identical duration. It is unclear if this effect results from surprising events becoming apparently protracted, or from repeated events becoming apparently contracted in time. To disambiguate, we used a non-relative duration reproduction task, in which several standards preceded a test stimulus that had to be reproduced. We manipulated the predictability of test content over successive presentations. Overall, our data suggest that predictable stimuli induce a contraction of apparent duration (Experiments 1, 3, and 4). We also examine sensitivity to test content, and find that predictable stimuli elicit less uptake of visual information (Experiments 2 and 3). We discuss these findings in relation to the predictive coding framework.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia. blake.saurels@uq.net.au.School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia. School of Psychology, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia.Department of Psychology, City, University of London, London, UK.School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Queensland, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31773508

Citation

Saurels, Blake W., et al. "Predictable Events Elicit Less Visual and Temporal Information Uptake in an Oddball Paradigm." Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, 2019.
Saurels BW, Lipp OV, Yarrow K, et al. Predictable events elicit less visual and temporal information uptake in an oddball paradigm. Atten Percept Psychophys. 2019.
Saurels, B. W., Lipp, O. V., Yarrow, K., & Arnold, D. H. (2019). Predictable events elicit less visual and temporal information uptake in an oddball paradigm. Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, doi:10.3758/s13414-019-01899-x.
Saurels BW, et al. Predictable Events Elicit Less Visual and Temporal Information Uptake in an Oddball Paradigm. Atten Percept Psychophys. 2019 Nov 26; PubMed PMID: 31773508.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predictable events elicit less visual and temporal information uptake in an oddball paradigm. AU - Saurels,Blake W, AU - Lipp,Ottmar V, AU - Yarrow,Kielan, AU - Arnold,Derek H, Y1 - 2019/11/26/ PY - 2019/11/28/entrez PY - 2019/11/28/pubmed PY - 2019/11/28/medline KW - Oddball KW - Time perception KW - prediction KW - visual sensitivity JF - Attention, perception & psychophysics JO - Atten Percept Psychophys N2 - In the visual oddball paradigm, surprising inputs can seem expanded in time relative to unsurprising repeated events. A horizontal input embedded in a train of successive vertical inputs can, for instance, seem relatively protracted in time, even if all inputs are presented for an identical duration. It is unclear if this effect results from surprising events becoming apparently protracted, or from repeated events becoming apparently contracted in time. To disambiguate, we used a non-relative duration reproduction task, in which several standards preceded a test stimulus that had to be reproduced. We manipulated the predictability of test content over successive presentations. Overall, our data suggest that predictable stimuli induce a contraction of apparent duration (Experiments 1, 3, and 4). We also examine sensitivity to test content, and find that predictable stimuli elicit less uptake of visual information (Experiments 2 and 3). We discuss these findings in relation to the predictive coding framework. SN - 1943-393X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31773508/Predictable_events_elicit_less_visual_and_temporal_information_uptake_in_an_oddball_paradigm L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3758/s13414-019-01899-x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -