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Acoustic trauma from continuous noise: Minimum exposures, issues in clinical trial design, and comments on magnetic resonance imaging exposures.
J Acoust Soc Am 2019; 146(5):3873JA

Abstract

Acoustic trauma (AT) is permanent hearing loss after a single noise exposure. A few human cases resulting from continuous, i.e., nonimpulsive noise, have been reported as reviewed by Ward [(1991). "Hearing loss from noise and music," presented at Audio Engineering Society, New York, October 4-8]. This paper updates that review by examining 11 cases in nine reports, from 1950 to 2006, with the intention of determining minimum exposures that may cause AT, including the potential risk of exposure to noise from magnetic resonance imaging machines. Diffuse-field related levels above 120 dBA for 10 s or more, or above 130 dBA for 2-3 s (values well above OSHA's unprotected exposure limits), can lead to AT. These cases appear to represent a susceptible fraction of the population, because much more intense exposures (e.g., 130 dBA for 32 min) have been tolerated by groups of volunteers who suffered only temporary threshold shifts. AT from continuous noise is unlikely to occur in OSHA-compliant hearing conservation programs, and probably rare enough in the general civilian population that clinical trials of drugs aimed at treating it are unlikely to be practical. AT from impulse noise, such as gunfire, which is specifically not the topic of the current work, is more amenable to clinical trials, especially in military settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Berger Acoustical Consulting, 221 Olde Mill Cove, Indianapolis, Indiana 46260, USA.University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, Texas 78229, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31795647

Citation

Berger, Elliott H., and Robert A. Dobie. "Acoustic Trauma From Continuous Noise: Minimum Exposures, Issues in Clinical Trial Design, and Comments On Magnetic Resonance Imaging Exposures." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 146, no. 5, 2019, p. 3873.
Berger EH, Dobie RA. Acoustic trauma from continuous noise: Minimum exposures, issues in clinical trial design, and comments on magnetic resonance imaging exposures. J Acoust Soc Am. 2019;146(5):3873.
Berger, E. H., & Dobie, R. A. (2019). Acoustic trauma from continuous noise: Minimum exposures, issues in clinical trial design, and comments on magnetic resonance imaging exposures. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 146(5), p. 3873. doi:10.1121/1.5132712.
Berger EH, Dobie RA. Acoustic Trauma From Continuous Noise: Minimum Exposures, Issues in Clinical Trial Design, and Comments On Magnetic Resonance Imaging Exposures. J Acoust Soc Am. 2019;146(5):3873. PubMed PMID: 31795647.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acoustic trauma from continuous noise: Minimum exposures, issues in clinical trial design, and comments on magnetic resonance imaging exposures. AU - Berger,Elliott H, AU - Dobie,Robert A, PY - 2019/12/5/entrez PY - 2019/12/5/pubmed PY - 2019/12/5/medline SP - 3873 EP - 3873 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J. Acoust. Soc. Am. VL - 146 IS - 5 N2 - Acoustic trauma (AT) is permanent hearing loss after a single noise exposure. A few human cases resulting from continuous, i.e., nonimpulsive noise, have been reported as reviewed by Ward [(1991). "Hearing loss from noise and music," presented at Audio Engineering Society, New York, October 4-8]. This paper updates that review by examining 11 cases in nine reports, from 1950 to 2006, with the intention of determining minimum exposures that may cause AT, including the potential risk of exposure to noise from magnetic resonance imaging machines. Diffuse-field related levels above 120 dBA for 10 s or more, or above 130 dBA for 2-3 s (values well above OSHA's unprotected exposure limits), can lead to AT. These cases appear to represent a susceptible fraction of the population, because much more intense exposures (e.g., 130 dBA for 32 min) have been tolerated by groups of volunteers who suffered only temporary threshold shifts. AT from continuous noise is unlikely to occur in OSHA-compliant hearing conservation programs, and probably rare enough in the general civilian population that clinical trials of drugs aimed at treating it are unlikely to be practical. AT from impulse noise, such as gunfire, which is specifically not the topic of the current work, is more amenable to clinical trials, especially in military settings. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31795647/Acoustic_trauma_from_continuous_noise:_Minimum_exposures,_issues_in_clinical_trial_design,_and_comments_on_magnetic_resonance_imaging_exposures L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.5132712 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -