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Incidence and Symptomatology of Vascular Crossed Aphasia in Bengali.
Cogn Behav Neurol 2019; 32(4):256-267CB

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Crossed aphasia (CA) refers to aphasia following a right-hemispheric lesion in right-handed individuals. It has been suggested that the prevalence of CA differs with language, although its worldwide incidence, as reported by most studies, is less than 3%.

OBJECTIVE

To find the incidence of CA in the Bengali language.

METHODS

From 2016 to 2018, in a hospital located in a Bengali-speaking area of eastern India, 515 cases of first-ever stroke were documented, out of which 208 patients presented with aphasia (40.38%) according to their scores on the Bengali version of the Western Aphasia Battery.

RESULTS

Among the patients with aphasia, 14 (6.73%; 8 men and 6 women) presented with CA. Of these, 10 were diagnosed with Broca aphasia and four with transcortical motor aphasia. No patient presented with Wernicke aphasia.

CONCLUSIONS

The relatively high incidence of CA in our study suggests that bi-hemispheric language representation may be more prevalent in Bengali speakers than in speakers of other languages. The absence of crossed Wernicke aphasia in our study participants may represent a left-hemispheric advantage for receptive language abilities in Bengali speakers. Further studies are required to clarify whether idiosyncrasies in the Bengali language may be responsible for the differential brain representation of language seen in our study participants.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial Hospital, Kolkata, India.Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial Hospital, Kolkata, India.Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial Hospital, Kolkata, India.Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial Hospital, Kolkata, India.Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial Hospital, Kolkata, India.Institute of Post-Graduate Medical Education and Research, Seth Sukhlal Karnani Memorial Hospital, Kolkata, India.Institute of Linguistics and Intercultural Communication, Sechenov University, Moscow, Russia. Doctoral Program, Albizu University, Miami, Florida.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31800486

Citation

Lahiri, Durjoy, et al. "Incidence and Symptomatology of Vascular Crossed Aphasia in Bengali." Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology : Official Journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology, vol. 32, no. 4, 2019, pp. 256-267.
Lahiri D, Dubey S, Sawale VM, et al. Incidence and Symptomatology of Vascular Crossed Aphasia in Bengali. Cogn Behav Neurol. 2019;32(4):256-267.
Lahiri, D., Dubey, S., Sawale, V. M., Das, G., Ray, B. K., Chatterjee, S., & Ardila, A. (2019). Incidence and Symptomatology of Vascular Crossed Aphasia in Bengali. Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology : Official Journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology, 32(4), pp. 256-267. doi:10.1097/WNN.0000000000000210.
Lahiri D, et al. Incidence and Symptomatology of Vascular Crossed Aphasia in Bengali. Cogn Behav Neurol. 2019;32(4):256-267. PubMed PMID: 31800486.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Incidence and Symptomatology of Vascular Crossed Aphasia in Bengali. AU - Lahiri,Durjoy, AU - Dubey,Souvik, AU - Sawale,Vishal M, AU - Das,Gautam, AU - Ray,Biman K, AU - Chatterjee,Suparna, AU - Ardila,Alfredo, PY - 2019/12/5/entrez PY - 2019/12/5/pubmed PY - 2019/12/5/medline SP - 256 EP - 267 JF - Cognitive and behavioral neurology : official journal of the Society for Behavioral and Cognitive Neurology JO - Cogn Behav Neurol VL - 32 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Crossed aphasia (CA) refers to aphasia following a right-hemispheric lesion in right-handed individuals. It has been suggested that the prevalence of CA differs with language, although its worldwide incidence, as reported by most studies, is less than 3%. OBJECTIVE: To find the incidence of CA in the Bengali language. METHODS: From 2016 to 2018, in a hospital located in a Bengali-speaking area of eastern India, 515 cases of first-ever stroke were documented, out of which 208 patients presented with aphasia (40.38%) according to their scores on the Bengali version of the Western Aphasia Battery. RESULTS: Among the patients with aphasia, 14 (6.73%; 8 men and 6 women) presented with CA. Of these, 10 were diagnosed with Broca aphasia and four with transcortical motor aphasia. No patient presented with Wernicke aphasia. CONCLUSIONS: The relatively high incidence of CA in our study suggests that bi-hemispheric language representation may be more prevalent in Bengali speakers than in speakers of other languages. The absence of crossed Wernicke aphasia in our study participants may represent a left-hemispheric advantage for receptive language abilities in Bengali speakers. Further studies are required to clarify whether idiosyncrasies in the Bengali language may be responsible for the differential brain representation of language seen in our study participants. SN - 1543-3641 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31800486/Incidence_and_Symptomatology_of_Vascular_Crossed_Aphasia_in_Bengali L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/WNN.0000000000000210 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -