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The Advantages and Disadvantages of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Primary Care Offices.
J Addict Nurs 2019 Oct/Dec; 30(4):238-241JA

Abstract

Substance use disorder (SUD), more specifically opioid use disorder, is a national epidemic. Although there is an emphasis on treatment and increasing treatment locations, there continues to be a gap between the number of people with SUD and the number of treatment centers. To help narrow this gap, some primary care clinicians started providing medication-assisted treatment (MAT) on an outpatient basis in their offices. This option enables clinicians to provide treatment in their own communities, which increases access to treatment and decreases costs. It also enables the clinician and the person with SUD/opioid use disorder to build a relationship, which many clinicians believe is the foundation of successful treatment. The clinician, whether a doctor, a physician assistant, or an advanced practice nurse, has to obtain a Drug Addiction Treatment Act 2000 waiver to provide MAT beyond naltrexone, which has a required educational program and includes a limitation on the number of clients. Conversely, a possible drawback to this type of treatment is the potential for the disruption of continuity of care with regard to psychotherapy treatment. Federal law mandates that therapy is available and provided to people receiving MAT. The clinician may not be able to provide this service and would need to refer the person with SUD for psychotherapy treatment. It may be clinically significant for a type of follow-up communication to be implemented so that the clinician and the therapy provider can maximize SUD treatment success.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tonja M. Padgett, RN, DNP, ACNS-BC, Indiana University School of Nursing, Indianapolis.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31800513

Citation

Padgett, Tonja M.. "The Advantages and Disadvantages of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Primary Care Offices." Journal of Addictions Nursing, vol. 30, no. 4, 2019, pp. 238-241.
Padgett TM. The Advantages and Disadvantages of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Primary Care Offices. J Addict Nurs. 2019;30(4):238-241.
Padgett, T. M. (2019). The Advantages and Disadvantages of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Primary Care Offices. Journal of Addictions Nursing, 30(4), pp. 238-241. doi:10.1097/JAN.0000000000000305.
Padgett TM. The Advantages and Disadvantages of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Primary Care Offices. J Addict Nurs. 2019;30(4):238-241. PubMed PMID: 31800513.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Advantages and Disadvantages of Medication-Assisted Treatment in Primary Care Offices. A1 - Padgett,Tonja M, PY - 2019/12/5/entrez PY - 2019/12/5/pubmed PY - 2019/12/5/medline SP - 238 EP - 241 JF - Journal of addictions nursing JO - J Addict Nurs VL - 30 IS - 4 N2 - Substance use disorder (SUD), more specifically opioid use disorder, is a national epidemic. Although there is an emphasis on treatment and increasing treatment locations, there continues to be a gap between the number of people with SUD and the number of treatment centers. To help narrow this gap, some primary care clinicians started providing medication-assisted treatment (MAT) on an outpatient basis in their offices. This option enables clinicians to provide treatment in their own communities, which increases access to treatment and decreases costs. It also enables the clinician and the person with SUD/opioid use disorder to build a relationship, which many clinicians believe is the foundation of successful treatment. The clinician, whether a doctor, a physician assistant, or an advanced practice nurse, has to obtain a Drug Addiction Treatment Act 2000 waiver to provide MAT beyond naltrexone, which has a required educational program and includes a limitation on the number of clients. Conversely, a possible drawback to this type of treatment is the potential for the disruption of continuity of care with regard to psychotherapy treatment. Federal law mandates that therapy is available and provided to people receiving MAT. The clinician may not be able to provide this service and would need to refer the person with SUD for psychotherapy treatment. It may be clinically significant for a type of follow-up communication to be implemented so that the clinician and the therapy provider can maximize SUD treatment success. SN - 1548-7148 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31800513/The_Advantages_and_Disadvantages_of_Medication-Assisted_Treatment_in_Primary_Care_Offices L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=31800513.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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