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Complementary medicine for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis - A patient perspective.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Complementary medicines and therapies (CMT) are recommended in osteoarthritis (OA) treatment guidelines; however, there are few studies on CMT use in the community. The present study explored the use and perceptions of CMT for OA management in a New Zealand population.

METHODS

Nineteen middle- to older-aged adults with hip or knee OA, recruited from a public hospital research database, engaged in focus groups exploring CMT knowledge, factors influencing CMT use, and the role of medical professionals in the decision-making process. Participants were organized into four groups, further to explore the impact of age or OA duration on CMT use.

RESULTS

Thematic analysis resulted in five themes, consistent across all groups: participants' perceptions of CMT; reasons for taking CMT; reasons for not taking CMT; sources and credibility of CMT information; and medical professionals' role in CMT use. Participants indicated a range of CMT use, yet were unclear what defined a product as 'CMT'. CMT use was influenced by symptom severity, previous experiences of themselves or trusted others, and perceived CMT effectiveness. General practitioners were identified as participants' preferred source of CMT information, owing to both their professional knowledge and lack of commercial gain from promoting CMT use.

CONCLUSION

Participants supported CMT for OA management, based on evidence and/or experience of effectiveness. Proactive general practitioner dialogue and subsidized CMT products recommended as part of a clinical treatment plan would encourage further CMT uptake. Additionally, the development of standardized CMT terminology would facilitate patient-doctor communication regarding CMT use and promote inter-professional dialogue regarding multidisciplinary patient treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.Musculoskeletal and Sports Injury Epidemiology Center (MUSIC), Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.Department of Health Sciences, Indiana University School of Health and Human Sciences, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine, Massage & Myotherapy Australia Fellow, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia.Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Department of Internal and Integrative Medicine, Sozialstiftung Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany.Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. Australian Research Centre in Complementary and Integrative Medicine (ARCCIM), Faculty of Health, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia. Department of Sport, Exercise & Rehabilitation, Northumbria University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31802602

Citation

Kim, ChoWool, et al. "Complementary Medicine for the Management of Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis - a Patient Perspective." Musculoskeletal Care, 2019.
Kim C, Stebbings S, Sundberg T, et al. Complementary medicine for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis - A patient perspective. Musculoskeletal Care. 2019.
Kim, C., Stebbings, S., Sundberg, T., Munk, N., Lauche, R., & Ward, L. (2019). Complementary medicine for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis - A patient perspective. Musculoskeletal Care, doi:10.1002/msc.1441.
Kim C, et al. Complementary Medicine for the Management of Knee and Hip Osteoarthritis - a Patient Perspective. Musculoskeletal Care. 2019 Dec 5; PubMed PMID: 31802602.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Complementary medicine for the management of knee and hip osteoarthritis - A patient perspective. AU - Kim,ChoWool, AU - Stebbings,Simon, AU - Sundberg,Tobias, AU - Munk,Niki, AU - Lauche,Romy, AU - Ward,Lesley, Y1 - 2019/12/05/ PY - 2019/10/05/received PY - 2019/10/18/revised PY - 2019/10/19/accepted PY - 2019/12/6/entrez PY - 2019/12/6/pubmed PY - 2019/12/6/medline KW - complementary medicine KW - osteoarthritis KW - patient preference KW - qualitative KW - self-management JF - Musculoskeletal care JO - Musculoskeletal Care N2 - BACKGROUND: Complementary medicines and therapies (CMT) are recommended in osteoarthritis (OA) treatment guidelines; however, there are few studies on CMT use in the community. The present study explored the use and perceptions of CMT for OA management in a New Zealand population. METHODS: Nineteen middle- to older-aged adults with hip or knee OA, recruited from a public hospital research database, engaged in focus groups exploring CMT knowledge, factors influencing CMT use, and the role of medical professionals in the decision-making process. Participants were organized into four groups, further to explore the impact of age or OA duration on CMT use. RESULTS: Thematic analysis resulted in five themes, consistent across all groups: participants' perceptions of CMT; reasons for taking CMT; reasons for not taking CMT; sources and credibility of CMT information; and medical professionals' role in CMT use. Participants indicated a range of CMT use, yet were unclear what defined a product as 'CMT'. CMT use was influenced by symptom severity, previous experiences of themselves or trusted others, and perceived CMT effectiveness. General practitioners were identified as participants' preferred source of CMT information, owing to both their professional knowledge and lack of commercial gain from promoting CMT use. CONCLUSION: Participants supported CMT for OA management, based on evidence and/or experience of effectiveness. Proactive general practitioner dialogue and subsidized CMT products recommended as part of a clinical treatment plan would encourage further CMT uptake. Additionally, the development of standardized CMT terminology would facilitate patient-doctor communication regarding CMT use and promote inter-professional dialogue regarding multidisciplinary patient treatment. SN - 1557-0681 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31802602/Complementary_medicine_for_the_management_of_knee_and_hip_osteoarthritis_-_A_patient_perspective L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/msc.1441 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -