Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes contribute to population divergence in a dioecious plant.
Evolution 2019E

Abstract

Empirical evidence from several animal groups suggests sex chromosomes disproportionately contribute to reproductive isolation. This effect may be enhanced when sex chromosomes are associated with turnover of sex determination systems resulting from structural rearrangements to the chromosomes. We investigated these predictions in the dioecious plant Rumex hastatulus, which is composed of populations of two different sex chromosome cytotypes caused by an X-autosome fusion. Using population genomic analyses, we investigated the demographic history of R. hastatulus and explored the contributions of ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes to population genetic divergence. Our study revealed that the cytotypes represent genetically divergent populations with evidence for historical but not contemporary gene flow between them. In agreement with classical predictions, we found that the ancestral X chromosome was disproportionately divergent compared with the rest of the genome. Excess differentiation was also observed on the Y chromosome, even when we used measures of differentiation that control for differences in effective population size. Our estimates of the timing of the origin of neo-sex chromosomes in R. hastatulus are coincident with cessation of gene flow, suggesting that the chromosomal fusion event that gave rise to the origin of the XYY cytotype may have also contributed to reproductive isolation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3B2, Canada.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3B2, Canada.Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, M5S 3B2, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31808547

Citation

Beaudry, Felix E G., et al. "Ancestral and Neo-sex Chromosomes Contribute to Population Divergence in a Dioecious Plant." Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution, 2019.
Beaudry FEG, Barrett SCH, Wright SI. Ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes contribute to population divergence in a dioecious plant. Evolution. 2019.
Beaudry, F. E. G., Barrett, S. C. H., & Wright, S. I. (2019). Ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes contribute to population divergence in a dioecious plant. Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution, doi:10.1111/evo.13892.
Beaudry FEG, Barrett SCH, Wright SI. Ancestral and Neo-sex Chromosomes Contribute to Population Divergence in a Dioecious Plant. Evolution. 2019 Dec 6; PubMed PMID: 31808547.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes contribute to population divergence in a dioecious plant. AU - Beaudry,Felix E G, AU - Barrett,Spencer C H, AU - Wright,Stephen I, Y1 - 2019/12/06/ PY - 2019/02/16/received PY - 2019/10/16/revised PY - 2019/11/11/accepted PY - 2019/12/7/pubmed PY - 2019/12/7/medline PY - 2019/12/7/entrez KW - Demographic history KW - Rumex KW - gene flow KW - plant sex chromosomes KW - population divergence KW - reproductive isolation JF - Evolution; international journal of organic evolution JO - Evolution N2 - Empirical evidence from several animal groups suggests sex chromosomes disproportionately contribute to reproductive isolation. This effect may be enhanced when sex chromosomes are associated with turnover of sex determination systems resulting from structural rearrangements to the chromosomes. We investigated these predictions in the dioecious plant Rumex hastatulus, which is composed of populations of two different sex chromosome cytotypes caused by an X-autosome fusion. Using population genomic analyses, we investigated the demographic history of R. hastatulus and explored the contributions of ancestral and neo-sex chromosomes to population genetic divergence. Our study revealed that the cytotypes represent genetically divergent populations with evidence for historical but not contemporary gene flow between them. In agreement with classical predictions, we found that the ancestral X chromosome was disproportionately divergent compared with the rest of the genome. Excess differentiation was also observed on the Y chromosome, even when we used measures of differentiation that control for differences in effective population size. Our estimates of the timing of the origin of neo-sex chromosomes in R. hastatulus are coincident with cessation of gene flow, suggesting that the chromosomal fusion event that gave rise to the origin of the XYY cytotype may have also contributed to reproductive isolation. SN - 1558-5646 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31808547/Ancestral_and_neo-sex_chromosomes_contribute_to_population_divergence_in_a_dioecious_plant L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13892 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -