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Prenatal polyunsaturated fatty acids and child asthma: Effect modification by maternal asthma and child sex.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Findings on prenatal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake and child wheeze and asthma have been inconsistent.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to examine associations between prenatal PUFA status and child wheeze/asthma and modifying effects of maternal asthma/atopy, child sex, and maternal race.

METHODS

Analyses included 1019 mother-child dyads with omega-3 (n-3) and omega-3 (n-6) PUFAs measured in second-trimester plasma; n-6/n-3 ratios were calculated. Child wheeze/asthma outcomes ascertained at age 4 to 6 years included ever physician-diagnosed asthma, current wheeze (symptoms past 12 months), current asthma (diagnosis and medication and/or symptoms past 12 months), and current diagnosed asthma. Each PUFA indicator and outcome was analyzed in separate models using modified Poisson regression with interaction terms.

RESULTS

In quartile (Q) analyses, higher n-6 PUFAs were associated with increased risk of ever (risk ratio [RR] high vs low [RR Q4 vs Q1], 1.70; 95% CI, 1.07-2.71) and current (RR Q4 vs Q1, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.07-2.71) diagnosed asthma, whereas n-3 PUFAs were associated with lower risk (RR Q4 vs Q1, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.33-1.03) of current diagnosed asthma (Ptrend < .05 for all). Higher n-6 PUFAs were associated with a higher risk of all respiratory outcomes among children born to women with asthma (Pinteraction < .05 for all outcomes). A significant 3-way interaction between child sex, maternal asthma, and n-6/n-3 PUFA indicated that male children born to women with asthma and a higher ratio had the highest risk across wheeze/asthma outcomes (Pinteraction < .05).

CONCLUSIONS

Associations between prenatal PUFA status and childhood wheeze/asthma were modified by maternal history of asthma and child sex.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Electronic address: maria.rosa@mssm.edu.Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, Ga.Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Department of Biostatistics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Division of Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.Center for Biomedical Informatics, University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, Memphis, Tenn.Department of Psychiatry, Weill Institute for the Neurosciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif.Department of Psychiatry, Weill Institute for the Neurosciences, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif; Department of Pediatrics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, Calif.Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Tennessee Health Science Center in Memphis, Memphis, Tenn.Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Institute for Exposomic Research, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY; Kravis Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY.Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31809758

Citation

Rosa, Maria José, et al. "Prenatal Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Child Asthma: Effect Modification By Maternal Asthma and Child Sex." The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2019.
Rosa MJ, Hartman TJ, Adgent M, et al. Prenatal polyunsaturated fatty acids and child asthma: Effect modification by maternal asthma and child sex. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019.
Rosa, M. J., Hartman, T. J., Adgent, M., Gardner, K., Gebretsadik, T., Moore, P. E., ... Carroll, K. N. (2019). Prenatal polyunsaturated fatty acids and child asthma: Effect modification by maternal asthma and child sex. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, doi:10.1016/j.jaci.2019.10.039.
Rosa MJ, et al. Prenatal Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids and Child Asthma: Effect Modification By Maternal Asthma and Child Sex. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2019 Dec 3; PubMed PMID: 31809758.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal polyunsaturated fatty acids and child asthma: Effect modification by maternal asthma and child sex. AU - Rosa,Maria José, AU - Hartman,Terryl J, AU - Adgent,Margaret, AU - Gardner,Kourtney, AU - Gebretsadik,Tebeb, AU - Moore,Paul E, AU - Davis,Robert L, AU - LeWinn,Kaja Z, AU - Bush,Nicole R, AU - Tylavsky,Frances, AU - Wright,Rosalind J, AU - Carroll,Kecia N, Y1 - 2019/12/03/ PY - 2019/06/28/received PY - 2019/10/08/revised PY - 2019/10/25/accepted PY - 2019/12/7/pubmed PY - 2019/12/7/medline PY - 2019/12/7/entrez KW - Polyunsaturated fatty acid KW - childhood asthma KW - prenatal KW - sex-specific effects JF - The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology JO - J. Allergy Clin. Immunol. N2 - BACKGROUND: Findings on prenatal polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake and child wheeze and asthma have been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: We sought to examine associations between prenatal PUFA status and child wheeze/asthma and modifying effects of maternal asthma/atopy, child sex, and maternal race. METHODS: Analyses included 1019 mother-child dyads with omega-3 (n-3) and omega-3 (n-6) PUFAs measured in second-trimester plasma; n-6/n-3 ratios were calculated. Child wheeze/asthma outcomes ascertained at age 4 to 6 years included ever physician-diagnosed asthma, current wheeze (symptoms past 12 months), current asthma (diagnosis and medication and/or symptoms past 12 months), and current diagnosed asthma. Each PUFA indicator and outcome was analyzed in separate models using modified Poisson regression with interaction terms. RESULTS: In quartile (Q) analyses, higher n-6 PUFAs were associated with increased risk of ever (risk ratio [RR] high vs low [RR Q4 vs Q1], 1.70; 95% CI, 1.07-2.71) and current (RR Q4 vs Q1, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.07-2.71) diagnosed asthma, whereas n-3 PUFAs were associated with lower risk (RR Q4 vs Q1, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.33-1.03) of current diagnosed asthma (Ptrend < .05 for all). Higher n-6 PUFAs were associated with a higher risk of all respiratory outcomes among children born to women with asthma (Pinteraction < .05 for all outcomes). A significant 3-way interaction between child sex, maternal asthma, and n-6/n-3 PUFA indicated that male children born to women with asthma and a higher ratio had the highest risk across wheeze/asthma outcomes (Pinteraction < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Associations between prenatal PUFA status and childhood wheeze/asthma were modified by maternal history of asthma and child sex. SN - 1097-6825 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31809758/Prenatal_polyunsaturated_fatty_acids_and_child_asthma:_effect_modification_by_maternal_asthma_and_child_sex L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-6749(19)31622-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -