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The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) study - Design and main findings.
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2020 04; 198:105562.JS

Abstract

Accumulating evidence from observational studies indicates that vitamin D status is inversely associated with a many non-skeletal diseases. This has initiated the conduct of several large clinical trials to determine if high dose vitamin D supplementation (≥ 2000 IU/day or monthly equivalent) prevents non-skeletal disease including cardiovascular disease, cancer and mortality. One of these trials is the Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) Study which recruited 5110 participants, aged 50-84 years, mostly from primary care practices in Auckland, New Zealand. The intervention was a capsule that contained either 100,000 IU vitamin D3 or placebo, two of which were taken by each participant soon after randomization, and then monthly up to 31 July 2015 (median follow-up 3.3 years). Information on study outcomes came from self-completed questionnaires and health data collected routinely by the Ministry of Health. There was no effect of vitamin D on the main outcomes: cardiovascular disease, acute respiratory infections, non-vertebral fractures, falls and all cancer. In contrast, vitamin D increased persistence with taking statins among participants on long term statin therapy. Beneficial effects were seen also for lung function among ever smokers (especially if vitamin D deficient), and in participants with low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels for bone mineral density and arterial function. The findings support future research being carried out mainly in people who are vitamin D deficient, although there are practical and ethical issues in recruiting such people into future vitamin D supplementation trials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. Electronic address: r.scragg@auckland.ac.nz.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31809866

Citation

Scragg, Robert. "The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) Study - Design and Main Findings." The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, vol. 198, 2020, p. 105562.
Scragg R. The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) study - Design and main findings. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2020;198:105562.
Scragg, R. (2020). The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) study - Design and main findings. The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 198, 105562. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsbmb.2019.105562
Scragg R. The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) Study - Design and Main Findings. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2020;198:105562. PubMed PMID: 31809866.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) study - Design and main findings. A1 - Scragg,Robert, Y1 - 2019/12/03/ PY - 2019/11/25/received PY - 2019/12/02/accepted PY - 2019/12/7/pubmed PY - 2020/8/13/medline PY - 2019/12/7/entrez KW - Cancer KW - Cardiovascular disease KW - Clinical trial KW - Falls KW - Fractures KW - Respiratory infection KW - Vitamin D supplementation SP - 105562 EP - 105562 JF - The Journal of steroid biochemistry and molecular biology JO - J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol VL - 198 N2 - Accumulating evidence from observational studies indicates that vitamin D status is inversely associated with a many non-skeletal diseases. This has initiated the conduct of several large clinical trials to determine if high dose vitamin D supplementation (≥ 2000 IU/day or monthly equivalent) prevents non-skeletal disease including cardiovascular disease, cancer and mortality. One of these trials is the Vitamin D Assessment (ViDA) Study which recruited 5110 participants, aged 50-84 years, mostly from primary care practices in Auckland, New Zealand. The intervention was a capsule that contained either 100,000 IU vitamin D3 or placebo, two of which were taken by each participant soon after randomization, and then monthly up to 31 July 2015 (median follow-up 3.3 years). Information on study outcomes came from self-completed questionnaires and health data collected routinely by the Ministry of Health. There was no effect of vitamin D on the main outcomes: cardiovascular disease, acute respiratory infections, non-vertebral fractures, falls and all cancer. In contrast, vitamin D increased persistence with taking statins among participants on long term statin therapy. Beneficial effects were seen also for lung function among ever smokers (especially if vitamin D deficient), and in participants with low 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels for bone mineral density and arterial function. The findings support future research being carried out mainly in people who are vitamin D deficient, although there are practical and ethical issues in recruiting such people into future vitamin D supplementation trials. SN - 1879-1220 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31809866/full_citation L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0960-0760(19)30701-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -