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Validation of an app-based portable spirometer in adolescents with asthma.
J Asthma 2019; :1-8JA

Abstract

Objectives:

Objective measurements of asthma impairment could aid teens in recognition of changes in asthma status over time. Ready access to a conventional spirometer is not realistic outside of the clinical setting. In this proof-of-concept study, we compared the performance of the VitalFlo mobile spirometer to the nSpire KoKo® sx1000 spirometer for accuracy in measuring Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) in adolescents with asthma.

Methods:

Two hundred forty pulmonary function measurements were collected from 48 adolescents with persistent asthma from the University of North Carolina's pediatric allergy and pulmonology subspecialty clinics. Participants performed spirometry with the nSpireKoKo® sx1000 spirometer and the VitalFlo spirometer during their clinic visits. 119 simulated FVC maneuvers were conducted on both devices to standardize measurements. Pearson correlations, Bland-Altman procedure, and two-sample comparison tests were performed to assess the relationship between the two spirometers.

Results:

VitalFlo measurements were significantly highly correlated with nSpireKoKo® spirometer values for FEV1, (r2=0.721, [95% CI, 0.749 ± 0.120], P < 0.001) and moderately for FVC (r2= 0.617, [95% CI, 0.640 ± 0.130], P < 0.001) measurements. There were no statistically significant differences of the mean FEV1 (M = 0.00764, SD = 0.364, t(59)=0.16, P = 0.87) and FVC measurements (M = 0.00261, SD = 0.565, t(59)=0.036, P = 0.97.) between the VitalFlo and nSpireKoKo® systems. Both devices demonstrated significantly high correlation when comparing the automated FVC (r2 = 0.997, [95% CI, 1.00 ± 0.00974], P < 0.001) measurements. Bland-Altman plots did not demonstrate significant bias between devices for both FEV1 (0.00764 L) and FVC (0.00261 L) measurements.

Conclusions:

Lung function measurements from the VitalFlo mobile spirometer were comparable to a commercially-available spirometer commonly used in clinical settings. This validated app-based spirometer for home use has the potential to improve asthma self-management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, & Lung Biology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC, USA. Department of Kinesiology, University of North Carolina, Charlotte, NC, USA.Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, & Lung Biology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC, USA.Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, & Lung Biology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC, USA.Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, & Lung Biology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC, USA.NSF Nanosystems Engineering Research Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors and Technologies (ASSIST), North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA. VitalFlo, Inc.Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, & Lung Biology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Raleigh, NC, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31810411

Citation

Ring, Brian, et al. "Validation of an App-based Portable Spirometer in Adolescents With Asthma." The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, 2019, pp. 1-8.
Ring B, Burbank AJ, Mills K, et al. Validation of an app-based portable spirometer in adolescents with asthma. J Asthma. 2019.
Ring, B., Burbank, A. J., Mills, K., Ivins, S., Dieffenderfer, J., & Hernandez, M. L. (2019). Validation of an app-based portable spirometer in adolescents with asthma. The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, pp. 1-8. doi:10.1080/02770903.2019.1702201.
Ring B, et al. Validation of an App-based Portable Spirometer in Adolescents With Asthma. J Asthma. 2019 Dec 10;1-8. PubMed PMID: 31810411.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Validation of an app-based portable spirometer in adolescents with asthma. AU - Ring,Brian, AU - Burbank,Allison J, AU - Mills,Katherine, AU - Ivins,Sally, AU - Dieffenderfer,James, AU - Hernandez,Michelle L, Y1 - 2019/12/10/ PY - 2019/12/8/pubmed PY - 2019/12/8/medline PY - 2019/12/8/entrez KW - Asthma KW - NCT02662413 KW - NCT02671643 KW - adolescent KW - bronchial diseases KW - control KW - immediate hypersensitivity KW - obstructive lung diseases KW - respiratory hypersensitivity KW - respiratory tract disease SP - 1 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma JO - J Asthma N2 - Objectives: Objective measurements of asthma impairment could aid teens in recognition of changes in asthma status over time. Ready access to a conventional spirometer is not realistic outside of the clinical setting. In this proof-of-concept study, we compared the performance of the VitalFlo mobile spirometer to the nSpire KoKo® sx1000 spirometer for accuracy in measuring Forced Expiratory Volume in one second (FEV1) and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) in adolescents with asthma.Methods: Two hundred forty pulmonary function measurements were collected from 48 adolescents with persistent asthma from the University of North Carolina's pediatric allergy and pulmonology subspecialty clinics. Participants performed spirometry with the nSpireKoKo® sx1000 spirometer and the VitalFlo spirometer during their clinic visits. 119 simulated FVC maneuvers were conducted on both devices to standardize measurements. Pearson correlations, Bland-Altman procedure, and two-sample comparison tests were performed to assess the relationship between the two spirometers.Results: VitalFlo measurements were significantly highly correlated with nSpireKoKo® spirometer values for FEV1, (r2=0.721, [95% CI, 0.749 ± 0.120], P < 0.001) and moderately for FVC (r2= 0.617, [95% CI, 0.640 ± 0.130], P < 0.001) measurements. There were no statistically significant differences of the mean FEV1 (M = 0.00764, SD = 0.364, t(59)=0.16, P = 0.87) and FVC measurements (M = 0.00261, SD = 0.565, t(59)=0.036, P = 0.97.) between the VitalFlo and nSpireKoKo® systems. Both devices demonstrated significantly high correlation when comparing the automated FVC (r2 = 0.997, [95% CI, 1.00 ± 0.00974], P < 0.001) measurements. Bland-Altman plots did not demonstrate significant bias between devices for both FEV1 (0.00764 L) and FVC (0.00261 L) measurements.Conclusions: Lung function measurements from the VitalFlo mobile spirometer were comparable to a commercially-available spirometer commonly used in clinical settings. This validated app-based spirometer for home use has the potential to improve asthma self-management. SN - 1532-4303 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31810411/Validation_of_an_App-based_Portable_Spirometer_in_Adolescents_with_Asthma L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02770903.2019.1702201 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -