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Association between Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption and Nutrient Intake, Nutritional Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016.
Nutrients. 2019 Dec 04; 11(12)N

Abstract

This study examined differences in dietary intake between ready-to-eat cereal eaters and non-eaters in adults from the United States. Participants (n = 5163) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016 were included. One-day dietary recall was used to define ready-to-eat cereal consumption status and estimate dietary intake in eaters and non-eaters. Data from Food Patterns Equivalent Database 2015-2016 were used to compare intakes of food groups by consumption status. Diet quality was assessed by Healthy Eating Index 2015. Nineteen percent of US adults were ready-to-eat cereal eaters; they had a similar level of energy intake as non-eaters, but they had significantly higher intake of dietary fiber, and several vitamins and minerals, such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin D. They were also more likely to meet nutrient recommendations. Compared to non-eaters, ready-to-eat cereal eaters had the same level of added sugar intake but they had significantly higher intake of whole grains, total fruits, and dairy products. The diet quality of ready-to-eat cereal eaters was significantly higher than that of non-eaters. The study supports that ready-to-eat cereal eaters have better dietary intake with a healthier dietary pattern than non-eaters in the United States.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition, General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN 55427, USA.Global Knowledge Solutions, General Mills India Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India.Global Knowledge Solutions, General Mills India Pvt. Ltd., Mumbai, Maharashtra 400076, India.Global Knowledge Solutions, General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN 55427, USA.Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition, General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN 55427, USA.Bell Institute of Health and Nutrition, General Mills, Inc., Minneapolis, MN 55427, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31817088

Citation

Zhu, Yong, et al. "Association Between Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption and Nutrient Intake, Nutritional Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016." Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 12, 2019.
Zhu Y, Jain N, Vanage V, et al. Association between Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption and Nutrient Intake, Nutritional Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016. Nutrients. 2019;11(12).
Zhu, Y., Jain, N., Vanage, V., Holschuh, N., Agler, A. H., & Smith, J. D. (2019). Association between Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption and Nutrient Intake, Nutritional Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016. Nutrients, 11(12). https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11122952
Zhu Y, et al. Association Between Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption and Nutrient Intake, Nutritional Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016. Nutrients. 2019 Dec 4;11(12) PubMed PMID: 31817088.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between Ready-to-Eat Cereal Consumption and Nutrient Intake, Nutritional Adequacy, and Diet Quality in Adults in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016. AU - Zhu,Yong, AU - Jain,Neha, AU - Vanage,Vipra, AU - Holschuh,Norton, AU - Agler,Anne Hermetet, AU - Smith,Jessica D, Y1 - 2019/12/04/ PY - 2019/09/09/received PY - 2019/11/28/revised PY - 2019/12/01/accepted PY - 2019/12/11/entrez PY - 2019/12/11/pubmed PY - 2020/7/7/medline KW - dietary intake KW - national health and nutrition examination survey KW - ready-to-eat cereal JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 11 IS - 12 N2 - This study examined differences in dietary intake between ready-to-eat cereal eaters and non-eaters in adults from the United States. Participants (n = 5163) from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2015-2016 were included. One-day dietary recall was used to define ready-to-eat cereal consumption status and estimate dietary intake in eaters and non-eaters. Data from Food Patterns Equivalent Database 2015-2016 were used to compare intakes of food groups by consumption status. Diet quality was assessed by Healthy Eating Index 2015. Nineteen percent of US adults were ready-to-eat cereal eaters; they had a similar level of energy intake as non-eaters, but they had significantly higher intake of dietary fiber, and several vitamins and minerals, such as calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, zinc, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin D. They were also more likely to meet nutrient recommendations. Compared to non-eaters, ready-to-eat cereal eaters had the same level of added sugar intake but they had significantly higher intake of whole grains, total fruits, and dairy products. The diet quality of ready-to-eat cereal eaters was significantly higher than that of non-eaters. The study supports that ready-to-eat cereal eaters have better dietary intake with a healthier dietary pattern than non-eaters in the United States. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31817088/Association_between_Ready_to_Eat_Cereal_Consumption_and_Nutrient_Intake_Nutritional_Adequacy_and_Diet_Quality_in_Adults_in_the_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_2015_2016_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu11122952 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -