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The Behavioral Biology of Teams: Multidisciplinary Contributions to Social Dynamics in Isolated, Confined, and Extreme Environments.
Front Psychol 2019; 10:2571FP

Abstract

Teams in isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environments face many risks to behavioral health, social dynamics, and team performance. Complex long-duration ICE operational settings such as spaceflight and military deployments are largely closed systems with tightly coupled components, often operating as autonomous microsocieties within isolated ecosystems. As such, all components of the system are presumed to interact and can positively or negatively influence team dynamics through direct or indirect pathways. However, modern team science frameworks rarely consider inputs to the team system from outside the social and behavioral sciences and rarely incorporate biological factors despite the brain and associated neurobiological systems as the nexus of input from the environment and necessary substrate for emergent team dynamics and performance. Here, we provide a high-level overview of several key neurobiological systems relevant to social dynamics. We then describe several key components of ICE systems that can interact with and on neurobiological systems as individual-level inputs influencing social dynamics over the team life cycle-specifically food and nutrition, exercise and physical activity, sleep/wake/work rhythms, and habitat design and layout. Finally, we identify opportunities and strategic considerations for multidisciplinary research and development. Our overarching goal is to encourage multidisciplinary expansion of team science through (1) prospective horizontal integration of variables outside the current bounds of team science as significant inputs to closed ICE team systems and (2) bidirectional vertical integration of biology as the necessary inputs and mediators of individual and team behavioral health and performance. Prospective efforts to account for the behavioral biology of teams in ICE settings through an integrated organizational neuroscience approach will enable the field of team science to better understand and support teams who work, live, serve, and explore in extreme environments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Behavioral Health & Performance Laboratory, Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division, Human Health and Performance Directorate, KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States.Advanced Food Technology, Human Systems Engineering and Development Division, Human Health and Performance Directorate, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States.Human Physiology, Performance, Protection, and Operations Laboratory, Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division, Human Health and Performance Directorate, KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States.Usability Testing and Analysis Facility, Human Systems Engineering and Development Division, Human Health and Performance Directorate, KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States.Human Factors and Behavioral Performance Element, Human Research Program, NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States.Nutritional Biochemistry Laboratory, Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division, Human Health and Performance Directorate, University of Texas Medical Branch/NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States.Behavioral Health & Performance Laboratory, Biomedical Research and Environmental Sciences Division, Human Health and Performance Directorate, KBR/NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX, United States.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31824374

Citation

Landon, Lauren Blackwell, et al. "The Behavioral Biology of Teams: Multidisciplinary Contributions to Social Dynamics in Isolated, Confined, and Extreme Environments." Frontiers in Psychology, vol. 10, 2019, p. 2571.
Landon LB, Douglas GL, Downs ME, et al. The Behavioral Biology of Teams: Multidisciplinary Contributions to Social Dynamics in Isolated, Confined, and Extreme Environments. Front Psychol. 2019;10:2571.
Landon, L. B., Douglas, G. L., Downs, M. E., Greene, M. R., Whitmire, A. M., Zwart, S. R., & Roma, P. G. (2019). The Behavioral Biology of Teams: Multidisciplinary Contributions to Social Dynamics in Isolated, Confined, and Extreme Environments. Frontiers in Psychology, 10, p. 2571. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02571.
Landon LB, et al. The Behavioral Biology of Teams: Multidisciplinary Contributions to Social Dynamics in Isolated, Confined, and Extreme Environments. Front Psychol. 2019;10:2571. PubMed PMID: 31824374.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Behavioral Biology of Teams: Multidisciplinary Contributions to Social Dynamics in Isolated, Confined, and Extreme Environments. AU - Landon,Lauren Blackwell, AU - Douglas,Grace L, AU - Downs,Meghan E, AU - Greene,Maya R, AU - Whitmire,Alexandra M, AU - Zwart,Sara R, AU - Roma,Peter G, Y1 - 2019/11/21/ PY - 2018/12/12/received PY - 2019/10/30/accepted PY - 2019/12/12/entrez PY - 2019/12/12/pubmed PY - 2019/12/12/medline KW - behavioral health KW - extreme environment KW - multidisciplinary KW - neurobiology KW - social dynamics KW - team performance SP - 2571 EP - 2571 JF - Frontiers in psychology JO - Front Psychol VL - 10 N2 - Teams in isolated, confined, and extreme (ICE) environments face many risks to behavioral health, social dynamics, and team performance. Complex long-duration ICE operational settings such as spaceflight and military deployments are largely closed systems with tightly coupled components, often operating as autonomous microsocieties within isolated ecosystems. As such, all components of the system are presumed to interact and can positively or negatively influence team dynamics through direct or indirect pathways. However, modern team science frameworks rarely consider inputs to the team system from outside the social and behavioral sciences and rarely incorporate biological factors despite the brain and associated neurobiological systems as the nexus of input from the environment and necessary substrate for emergent team dynamics and performance. Here, we provide a high-level overview of several key neurobiological systems relevant to social dynamics. We then describe several key components of ICE systems that can interact with and on neurobiological systems as individual-level inputs influencing social dynamics over the team life cycle-specifically food and nutrition, exercise and physical activity, sleep/wake/work rhythms, and habitat design and layout. Finally, we identify opportunities and strategic considerations for multidisciplinary research and development. Our overarching goal is to encourage multidisciplinary expansion of team science through (1) prospective horizontal integration of variables outside the current bounds of team science as significant inputs to closed ICE team systems and (2) bidirectional vertical integration of biology as the necessary inputs and mediators of individual and team behavioral health and performance. Prospective efforts to account for the behavioral biology of teams in ICE settings through an integrated organizational neuroscience approach will enable the field of team science to better understand and support teams who work, live, serve, and explore in extreme environments. SN - 1664-1078 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31824374/The_Behavioral_Biology_of_Teams:_Multidisciplinary_Contributions_to_Social_Dynamics_in_Isolated,_Confined,_and_Extreme_Environments L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2019.02571 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -