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Stars versus warnings: Comparison of the Australasian Health Star Rating nutrition labelling system with Chilean Warning Labels.
Aust N Z J Public Health. 2020 Feb; 44(1):28-33.AN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The Health Star Rating (HSR) is a voluntary front-of-pack nutrition labelling system that rates products from ½ to 5 stars (five being healthiest). The Chilean Warning Label system displays warnings on foods high in sugar, saturated fat, sodium, or energy. We aimed to evaluate alignment between the systems.

METHODS

New Zealand packaged products (n=13,868) were classified according to the two systems. Alignment was assessed by cross-checking the number of products meeting the criteria for warnings against star ratings. Products with no warnings but an HSR <2, or with >1 warning but an HSR of ≥3.5 were considered outliers.

RESULTS

Two-thirds of products met the criteria for at least one warning. There was a significant positive relationship between the number of warnings and mean HSR: 0 warnings = HSR 3.77±.0166 (p<0.001), 1 warning = HSR 2.70±.0206 (p<0.001) and >1 warning = HSR 2.00±.0160 (p<0.001). The systems were non-aligned for 1,117 products (8%).

CONCLUSION

HSR and the Chilean Warning Label systems are broadly aligned. Non-alignment is due to the Chilean system restricting warnings to foods containing added ingredients and HSR awarding points for positive components. Implications for public health: These results could be helpful in informing improvements to the HSR system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Stockholm University, Sweden. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, New Zealand.National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland, New Zealand. The George Institute for Global Health, New South Wales, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31825560

Citation

Söderlund, Fredrik, et al. "Stars Versus Warnings: Comparison of the Australasian Health Star Rating Nutrition Labelling System With Chilean Warning Labels." Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, vol. 44, no. 1, 2020, pp. 28-33.
Söderlund F, Eyles H, Mhurchu CN. Stars versus warnings: Comparison of the Australasian Health Star Rating nutrition labelling system with Chilean Warning Labels. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2020;44(1):28-33.
Söderlund, F., Eyles, H., & Mhurchu, C. N. (2020). Stars versus warnings: Comparison of the Australasian Health Star Rating nutrition labelling system with Chilean Warning Labels. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 44(1), 28-33. https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12959
Söderlund F, Eyles H, Mhurchu CN. Stars Versus Warnings: Comparison of the Australasian Health Star Rating Nutrition Labelling System With Chilean Warning Labels. Aust N Z J Public Health. 2020;44(1):28-33. PubMed PMID: 31825560.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Stars versus warnings: Comparison of the Australasian Health Star Rating nutrition labelling system with Chilean Warning Labels. AU - Söderlund,Fredrik, AU - Eyles,Helen, AU - Mhurchu,Cliona Ni, Y1 - 2019/12/11/ PY - 2019/08/01/received PY - 2019/10/01/revised PY - 2019/11/01/accepted PY - 2019/12/12/pubmed PY - 2020/3/5/medline PY - 2019/12/12/entrez KW - Chilean Warning Labels KW - Health Star Rating KW - food labels KW - nutrition labelling SP - 28 EP - 33 JF - Australian and New Zealand journal of public health JO - Aust N Z J Public Health VL - 44 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The Health Star Rating (HSR) is a voluntary front-of-pack nutrition labelling system that rates products from ½ to 5 stars (five being healthiest). The Chilean Warning Label system displays warnings on foods high in sugar, saturated fat, sodium, or energy. We aimed to evaluate alignment between the systems. METHODS: New Zealand packaged products (n=13,868) were classified according to the two systems. Alignment was assessed by cross-checking the number of products meeting the criteria for warnings against star ratings. Products with no warnings but an HSR <2, or with >1 warning but an HSR of ≥3.5 were considered outliers. RESULTS: Two-thirds of products met the criteria for at least one warning. There was a significant positive relationship between the number of warnings and mean HSR: 0 warnings = HSR 3.77±.0166 (p<0.001), 1 warning = HSR 2.70±.0206 (p<0.001) and >1 warning = HSR 2.00±.0160 (p<0.001). The systems were non-aligned for 1,117 products (8%). CONCLUSION: HSR and the Chilean Warning Label systems are broadly aligned. Non-alignment is due to the Chilean system restricting warnings to foods containing added ingredients and HSR awarding points for positive components. Implications for public health: These results could be helpful in informing improvements to the HSR system. SN - 1753-6405 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31825560/Stars_versus_warnings:_Comparison_of_the_Australasian_Health_Star_Rating_nutrition_labelling_system_with_Chilean_Warning_Labels_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-6405.12959 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -