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Increased risk for hip fracture after death of a spouse-further support for bereavement frailty?

Abstract

Death of a spouse is associated with poorer physical and mental health. We followed all married individuals, born from 1902 to 1942, during the period from 1987 to 2002, and found that widows and widowers had higher risk for hip fracture, compared with still married women and men.

INTRODUCTION

Spousal bereavement can lead to poorer physical and mental health. We aimed to determine whether married women and men had an elevated risk of hip fracture after death of a spouse.

METHODS

In a retrospective cohort study, we followed all Swedish married individuals aged 60 to 100 years (n = 1,783,035), from 1987 to 2002. Data are presented as mean with 95% confidence interval (CI).

RESULTS

During the follow-up period, 21,305 hip fractures among widows and 6538 hip fractures among widowers were noted. The hazard ratio (HR) for hip fracture in widows compared with married women was 1.34 (95% CI 1.31 to 1.37) and for widowers compared with married men 1.32 (95% CI 1.29 to 1.35). The HR for hip fracture in the first 6 months after death of a spouse was in widows compared with married women 1.62 (95% CI 1.53 to 1.71) and in widowers compared with married men 1.84 (95% CI 1.68 to 2.03). The elevated risk was especially prominent in young widowers in the age range 60-69 years. During the first 6 months they showed a HR of 2.76 (95% CI 1.66 to 4.58) for a hip fractvure compared with age matched married men. Widows aged 60-69 years showed a HR of 1.59 (95% CI 1.26 to 1.99) compared with age matched married women.

CONCLUSION

Our observation of a higher hip fracture risk in both genders in connection with the death of a spouse indicates a possible effect of bereavement on frailty.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. cecilie.hongslo.vala@gu.se. Region Västra Götaland, Geriatric Medicine Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 431 80, Mölndal, Sweden. cecilie.hongslo.vala@gu.se.Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. Region Västra Götaland, Geriatric Medicine Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 431 80, Mölndal, Sweden. Mary McKillop Health Institute, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden.Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. Mary McKillop Health Institute, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.Section of Haematology and Coagulation, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 413 45, Gothenburg, Sweden.Department of Archaeology and Ancient History, Uppsala University-Campus Gotland, 621 57, Visby, Sweden.Department of Orthopedics and Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Lund University, 205 02, Malmö, Sweden.Center for Bone and Arthritis Research (CBAR), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45, Gothenburg, Sweden.Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, 405 30, Gothenburg, Sweden.Mary McKillop Health Institute, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia. Centre for Metabolic Bone Disease, Medical School, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S10 2RX, UK.Geriatric Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45, Göteborg, Sweden. Region Västra Götaland, Geriatric Medicine Clinic, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, 431 80, Mölndal, Sweden. Center for Bone and Arthritis Research (CBAR), Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, 413 45, Gothenburg, Sweden.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31832693

Citation

Vala, C H., et al. "Increased Risk for Hip Fracture After Death of a Spouse-further Support for Bereavement Frailty?" Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 2019.
Vala CH, Lorentzon M, Sundh V, et al. Increased risk for hip fracture after death of a spouse-further support for bereavement frailty? Osteoporos Int. 2019.
Vala, C. H., Lorentzon, M., Sundh, V., Johansson, H., Lewerin, C., Sten, S., ... Mellström, D. (2019). Increased risk for hip fracture after death of a spouse-further support for bereavement frailty? Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, doi:10.1007/s00198-019-05242-w.
Vala CH, et al. Increased Risk for Hip Fracture After Death of a Spouse-further Support for Bereavement Frailty. Osteoporos Int. 2019 Dec 12; PubMed PMID: 31832693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increased risk for hip fracture after death of a spouse-further support for bereavement frailty? AU - Vala,C H, AU - Lorentzon,M, AU - Sundh,V, AU - Johansson,H, AU - Lewerin,C, AU - Sten,S, AU - Karlsson,M, AU - Ohlsson,C, AU - Johansson,B, AU - Kanis,J A, AU - Mellström,D, Y1 - 2019/12/12/ PY - 2019/07/09/received PY - 2019/11/19/accepted PY - 2019/12/14/entrez PY - 2019/12/14/pubmed PY - 2019/12/14/medline KW - Bereavement KW - Hip fracture KW - Osteoporosis KW - Widow KW - Widower KW - Widowhood JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int N2 - : Death of a spouse is associated with poorer physical and mental health. We followed all married individuals, born from 1902 to 1942, during the period from 1987 to 2002, and found that widows and widowers had higher risk for hip fracture, compared with still married women and men. INTRODUCTION: Spousal bereavement can lead to poorer physical and mental health. We aimed to determine whether married women and men had an elevated risk of hip fracture after death of a spouse. METHODS: In a retrospective cohort study, we followed all Swedish married individuals aged 60 to 100 years (n = 1,783,035), from 1987 to 2002. Data are presented as mean with 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 21,305 hip fractures among widows and 6538 hip fractures among widowers were noted. The hazard ratio (HR) for hip fracture in widows compared with married women was 1.34 (95% CI 1.31 to 1.37) and for widowers compared with married men 1.32 (95% CI 1.29 to 1.35). The HR for hip fracture in the first 6 months after death of a spouse was in widows compared with married women 1.62 (95% CI 1.53 to 1.71) and in widowers compared with married men 1.84 (95% CI 1.68 to 2.03). The elevated risk was especially prominent in young widowers in the age range 60-69 years. During the first 6 months they showed a HR of 2.76 (95% CI 1.66 to 4.58) for a hip fractvure compared with age matched married men. Widows aged 60-69 years showed a HR of 1.59 (95% CI 1.26 to 1.99) compared with age matched married women. CONCLUSION: Our observation of a higher hip fracture risk in both genders in connection with the death of a spouse indicates a possible effect of bereavement on frailty. SN - 1433-2965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31832693/Increased_risk_for_hip_fracture_after_death_of_a_spouse-further_support_for_bereavement_frailty L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-019-05242-w DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -