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Dogs as New Hosts for the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Anaplasma capra in China.

Abstract

Anaplasma capra is an emerging zoonotic tick-borne pathogen with a broad host range, including many mammals. Dogs have close physical interactions with humans and regular contact with the external environment. Moreover, they have been previously reported to be hosts of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, A. platys, A. ovis, and A. bovis. To confirm whether dogs are also hosts of A. capra, pathogen DNA was extracted from blood samples of 521 dogs, followed by PCR amplification of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene, heat shock protein (groEL) gene, and major surface protein 4 (msp4) gene of the A. capra. A total of 12.1% (63/521) of blood samples were shown to be A. capra-positive by PCR screening. No significant differences were observed between genders (P = 0.578) or types (P = 0.154) of dogs with A. capra infections. However, significantly higher A. capra infections occurred in dogs with regular contact with vegetation (P = 0.002), those aged over 10 years (P = 0.040), and during the summer season (P = 0.006). Phylogenetic analysis based on gltA, groEL, and msp4 sequences demonstrated that the isolates obtained in this study were clustered within the A. capra clade, and were distinct from other Anaplasma species. In conclusion, dogs were shown to be a host of the human pathogenic A. capra. Considering the affinity between dogs and humans and the zoonotic tick-borne nature of A. capra, dogs should be carefully monitored for the presence of A. capra.

Authors+Show Affiliations

College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China. International Joint Research Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases of Henan, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China. Scientific Research Experiment Center & Laboratory Animal Center, Henan University of Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China. International Joint Research Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases of Henan, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China. International Joint Research Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases of Henan, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China. International Joint Research Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases of Henan, Zhengzhou, China.College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University, Zhengzhou, China. International Joint Research Laboratory for Zoonotic Diseases of Henan, Zhengzhou, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31850236

Citation

Shi, Ke, et al. "Dogs as New Hosts for the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Anaplasma Capra in China." Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, vol. 9, 2019, p. 394.
Shi K, Li J, Yan Y, et al. Dogs as New Hosts for the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Anaplasma capra in China. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2019;9:394.
Shi, K., Li, J., Yan, Y., Chen, Q., Wang, K., Zhou, Y., Li, D., Chen, Y., Yu, F., Peng, Y., Zhang, L., & Ning, C. (2019). Dogs as New Hosts for the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Anaplasma capra in China. Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, 9, 394. https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2019.00394
Shi K, et al. Dogs as New Hosts for the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Anaplasma Capra in China. Front Cell Infect Microbiol. 2019;9:394. PubMed PMID: 31850236.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dogs as New Hosts for the Emerging Zoonotic Pathogen Anaplasma capra in China. AU - Shi,Ke, AU - Li,Junqiang, AU - Yan,Yaqun, AU - Chen,Qian, AU - Wang,Kunlun, AU - Zhou,Yongchun, AU - Li,Dongfang, AU - Chen,Yuancai, AU - Yu,Fuchang, AU - Peng,Yongshuai, AU - Zhang,Longxian, AU - Ning,Changshen, Y1 - 2019/11/26/ PY - 2019/07/19/received PY - 2019/11/04/accepted PY - 2019/12/19/entrez PY - 2019/12/19/pubmed PY - 2020/8/12/medline KW - Anaplasma capra KW - dogs KW - hosts KW - tick-borne KW - zoonotic SP - 394 EP - 394 JF - Frontiers in cellular and infection microbiology JO - Front Cell Infect Microbiol VL - 9 N2 - Anaplasma capra is an emerging zoonotic tick-borne pathogen with a broad host range, including many mammals. Dogs have close physical interactions with humans and regular contact with the external environment. Moreover, they have been previously reported to be hosts of Anaplasma phagocytophilum, A. platys, A. ovis, and A. bovis. To confirm whether dogs are also hosts of A. capra, pathogen DNA was extracted from blood samples of 521 dogs, followed by PCR amplification of the citrate synthase (gltA) gene, heat shock protein (groEL) gene, and major surface protein 4 (msp4) gene of the A. capra. A total of 12.1% (63/521) of blood samples were shown to be A. capra-positive by PCR screening. No significant differences were observed between genders (P = 0.578) or types (P = 0.154) of dogs with A. capra infections. However, significantly higher A. capra infections occurred in dogs with regular contact with vegetation (P = 0.002), those aged over 10 years (P = 0.040), and during the summer season (P = 0.006). Phylogenetic analysis based on gltA, groEL, and msp4 sequences demonstrated that the isolates obtained in this study were clustered within the A. capra clade, and were distinct from other Anaplasma species. In conclusion, dogs were shown to be a host of the human pathogenic A. capra. Considering the affinity between dogs and humans and the zoonotic tick-borne nature of A. capra, dogs should be carefully monitored for the presence of A. capra. SN - 2235-2988 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31850236/Dogs_as_New_Hosts_for_the_Emerging_Zoonotic_Pathogen_Anaplasma_capra_in_China_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fcimb.2019.00394 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -