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Reviewing the risk of feed as a vehicle for swine pathogen transmission.
Vet Med Sci. 2019 Dec 18 [Online ahead of print]VM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

While porcine biological hazards have had the potential to be transmitted through feed and feed mills for decades, the emerging threat of foreign animal disease has elevated the concern that these may enter or be transmitted throughout the domestic swine herd via a feed vehicle.

OBJECTIVE

The goal of this review was to describe the current classification for emerging porcine biological pathogen transmission through the feed supply chain so resources can be best directed towards those of highest risk.

METHODS

By assessing the pathogen severity to pigs and the probability of pathogen transmission through feed, an overall risk can be established using a hazard analysis matrix.

RESULTS

There is negligible risk for feed-based transmission of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, Trichinella spiralis, Toxoplasma gondii, Salmonella Choleraesuis, Salmonella spp. except Choleraesuis and I 4,[5],12:i:-, porcine deltacoronavirus, Senecavirus A, mammalian orthoreovirus 3, foot and mouth disease virus, classical swine fever virus or Chinese pseudorabies virus. However, the combined severity and probability of Salmonella enterica serotype I 4,[5],12:i:-, porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus and African swine fever virus warrant a moderate risk characterization for transmission through the US feed supply chain.

CONCLUSIONS

This risk can be maintained below critical status by minimizing the likelihood that a pathogen can enter the feed supply chain, such as by excluding high-risk ingredients from facilities, extending biosecurity to mills, and considering proactive mitigation strategies. In reality, all these actions may be necessary to prevent the detrimental transmission of porcine biological hazards into the US swine herd through the feed supply chain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.Department of Animal Sciences and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.Department of Diagnostic Medicine/Pathobiology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.Department of Grain Science and Industry, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31854118

Citation

Jones, Cassandra K., et al. "Reviewing the Risk of Feed as a Vehicle for Swine Pathogen Transmission." Veterinary Medicine and Science, 2019.
Jones CK, Woodworth J, Dritz SS, et al. Reviewing the risk of feed as a vehicle for swine pathogen transmission. Vet Med Sci. 2019.
Jones, C. K., Woodworth, J., Dritz, S. S., & Paulk, C. B. (2019). Reviewing the risk of feed as a vehicle for swine pathogen transmission. Veterinary Medicine and Science. https://doi.org/10.1002/vms3.227
Jones CK, et al. Reviewing the Risk of Feed as a Vehicle for Swine Pathogen Transmission. Vet Med Sci. 2019 Dec 18; PubMed PMID: 31854118.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Reviewing the risk of feed as a vehicle for swine pathogen transmission. AU - Jones,Cassandra K, AU - Woodworth,Jason, AU - Dritz,Steve S, AU - Paulk,Chad B, Y1 - 2019/12/18/ PY - 2019/12/20/entrez KW - animal food KW - bacteria KW - biological KW - feed KW - hazard KW - virus JF - Veterinary medicine and science JO - Vet Med Sci N2 - BACKGROUND: While porcine biological hazards have had the potential to be transmitted through feed and feed mills for decades, the emerging threat of foreign animal disease has elevated the concern that these may enter or be transmitted throughout the domestic swine herd via a feed vehicle. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this review was to describe the current classification for emerging porcine biological pathogen transmission through the feed supply chain so resources can be best directed towards those of highest risk. METHODS: By assessing the pathogen severity to pigs and the probability of pathogen transmission through feed, an overall risk can be established using a hazard analysis matrix. RESULTS: There is negligible risk for feed-based transmission of a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy, Trichinella spiralis, Toxoplasma gondii, Salmonella Choleraesuis, Salmonella spp. except Choleraesuis and I 4,[5],12:i:-, porcine deltacoronavirus, Senecavirus A, mammalian orthoreovirus 3, foot and mouth disease virus, classical swine fever virus or Chinese pseudorabies virus. However, the combined severity and probability of Salmonella enterica serotype I 4,[5],12:i:-, porcine epidemic diarrhoea virus and African swine fever virus warrant a moderate risk characterization for transmission through the US feed supply chain. CONCLUSIONS: This risk can be maintained below critical status by minimizing the likelihood that a pathogen can enter the feed supply chain, such as by excluding high-risk ingredients from facilities, extending biosecurity to mills, and considering proactive mitigation strategies. In reality, all these actions may be necessary to prevent the detrimental transmission of porcine biological hazards into the US swine herd through the feed supply chain. SN - 2053-1095 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31854118/Reviewing_the_risk_of_feed_as_a_vehicle_for_swine_pathogen_transmission L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/vms3.227 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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