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Looking Back at Withdrawal of Life-Support Law and Policy to See What Lies Ahead for Medical Aid-in-Dying.
Yale J Biol Med. 2019 12; 92(4):781-791.YJ

Abstract

Current efforts to legalize medical aid-in-dying in this country follow a half century of remarkable legal developments regarding when, how, and on whose terms to intervene to prevent death and extend life in critically and terminally ill patients. The starting point-which I call the first stage along the path-was the creation in the two decades following World War II of powerful means of keeping very ill, and typically unconscious, patients alive. The second stage began in the late 1960s as physicians (and then others in society) began to grapple with the consequences of maintaining such patients on life-support indefinitely. Over five decades, judicial decisions, followed by implementing statutes and regulations, transformed legal rights and medical practices. Are the current developments-which center on legalizing medical aid-in-dying-a third stage along the same path, or do the striking differences between the issues raised about life-sustaining treatment and euthanasia suggest that they are separate? What lessons might those proceeding along the aid-in-dying path take from the development of the other path, and if the two paths are still distinct today, might they merge in the future?

Authors+Show Affiliations

University Professor, Scott H. Bice Chair in Healthcare Law, Policy, and Ethics, Gould School of Law, Professor of Medicine and Law, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31866795

Citation

Capron, Alexander Morgan. "Looking Back at Withdrawal of Life-Support Law and Policy to See what Lies Ahead for Medical Aid-in-Dying." The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, vol. 92, no. 4, 2019, pp. 781-791.
Capron AM. Looking Back at Withdrawal of Life-Support Law and Policy to See What Lies Ahead for Medical Aid-in-Dying. Yale J Biol Med. 2019;92(4):781-791.
Capron, A. M. (2019). Looking Back at Withdrawal of Life-Support Law and Policy to See What Lies Ahead for Medical Aid-in-Dying. The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine, 92(4), 781-791.
Capron AM. Looking Back at Withdrawal of Life-Support Law and Policy to See what Lies Ahead for Medical Aid-in-Dying. Yale J Biol Med. 2019;92(4):781-791. PubMed PMID: 31866795.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Looking Back at Withdrawal of Life-Support Law and Policy to See What Lies Ahead for Medical Aid-in-Dying. A1 - Capron,Alexander Morgan, Y1 - 2019/12/20/ PY - 2019/12/24/entrez PY - 2019/12/24/pubmed PY - 2019/12/24/medline KW - Brittany Maynard KW - Cruzan case KW - Quinlan case KW - US Supreme Court KW - advance directive KW - allowing to die KW - durable power of attorney for healthcare KW - euthanasia KW - extraordinary treatment KW - healthcare agent KW - medical aid-in-dying KW - nonbeneficial care KW - physician-assisted suicide KW - surrogate decisionmaker KW - terminal condition KW - withholding or withdrawing life-sustaining treatment SP - 781 EP - 791 JF - The Yale journal of biology and medicine JO - Yale J Biol Med VL - 92 IS - 4 N2 - Current efforts to legalize medical aid-in-dying in this country follow a half century of remarkable legal developments regarding when, how, and on whose terms to intervene to prevent death and extend life in critically and terminally ill patients. The starting point-which I call the first stage along the path-was the creation in the two decades following World War II of powerful means of keeping very ill, and typically unconscious, patients alive. The second stage began in the late 1960s as physicians (and then others in society) began to grapple with the consequences of maintaining such patients on life-support indefinitely. Over five decades, judicial decisions, followed by implementing statutes and regulations, transformed legal rights and medical practices. Are the current developments-which center on legalizing medical aid-in-dying-a third stage along the same path, or do the striking differences between the issues raised about life-sustaining treatment and euthanasia suggest that they are separate? What lessons might those proceeding along the aid-in-dying path take from the development of the other path, and if the two paths are still distinct today, might they merge in the future? SN - 1551-4056 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31866795/Looking_Back_at_Withdrawal_of_Life-Support_Law_and_Policy_to_See_What_Lies_Ahead_for_Medical_Aid-in-Dying L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/31866795/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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