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Effects of human milk fortifier properties on intrinsic probiotic bacteria.
J Perinat Med. 2020 Feb 25; 48(2):179-183.JP

Abstract

Background To meet the nutritional needs of preterm infants, multicomponent nutrient fortifiers are added to human milk. The fortified human milk (FHM) product changes the physical and biochemical characteristics of the milk. We questioned whether such physical-chemical changes in the milk would alter intrinsic probiotic bacterial activity. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of osmolality and pH on the growth of probiotic bacterial species intrinsic to human milk. Methods Human milk samples (n = 26) were collected from mothers in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and stored at -20°C until analyzed. The samples were thawed and divided into three portions. Human milk fortifiers (HMFs) were added to two portions to prepare concentrations of FHM. The remaining portion was the unfortified control sample. Each sample was then divided into two parts. One part (baseline) was used to measure the osmolality and pH and plated on selective agar to enumerate the growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria species. The remaining part was incubated at 37°C for 24 h to further test bacterial integrity (post-incubation) and then the same measurements were made (osmolality, pH, bacterial colony counts). Results When compared with unfortified milk at baseline, osmolality increased and pH decreased significantly after the addition of HMFs. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria colony counts did not differ among the groups pre-incubation. Post-incubation lactobacilli and bifidobacteria increased in all the groups. Conclusion The appropriate addition of HMFs differentially affected the osmolality and pH of the milk. These physical changes did not affect the growth of probiotic bacterial species.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Cohen Children's Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY 11040, USA. Institute of Molecular Medicine, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA. Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA. Departments of Pediatrics and Molecular Medicine, Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, NY 11549, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Biostatistics Unit, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA.Lilling Family Neonatal Research Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY, USA. Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Cohen Children's Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USA. Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell, Hempstead, NY 11549, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31874102

Citation

Codipilly, Champa N., et al. "Effects of Human Milk Fortifier Properties On Intrinsic Probiotic Bacteria." Journal of Perinatal Medicine, vol. 48, no. 2, 2020, pp. 179-183.
Codipilly CN, Koppel A, Ranasinghe O, et al. Effects of human milk fortifier properties on intrinsic probiotic bacteria. J Perinat Med. 2020;48(2):179-183.
Codipilly, C. N., Koppel, A., Ranasinghe, O., Roffe, S., Ahn, S., Navarathna, M., Abeyweera, N., Coors, C., Purushotham, A., Kamoga, R., & Schanler, R. J. (2020). Effects of human milk fortifier properties on intrinsic probiotic bacteria. Journal of Perinatal Medicine, 48(2), 179-183. https://doi.org/10.1515/jpm-2019-0205
Codipilly CN, et al. Effects of Human Milk Fortifier Properties On Intrinsic Probiotic Bacteria. J Perinat Med. 2020 Feb 25;48(2):179-183. PubMed PMID: 31874102.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of human milk fortifier properties on intrinsic probiotic bacteria. AU - Codipilly,Champa N, AU - Koppel,Adira, AU - Ranasinghe,Oneli, AU - Roffe,Stephanie, AU - Ahn,Seungjun, AU - Navarathna,Malithi, AU - Abeyweera,Nishmi, AU - Coors,Callie, AU - Purushotham,Amika, AU - Kamoga,Ronnie, AU - Schanler,Richard J, PY - 2019/06/07/received PY - 2019/11/21/accepted PY - 2019/12/25/pubmed PY - 2019/12/25/medline PY - 2019/12/25/entrez KW - human milk KW - human milk fortifiers KW - osmolality KW - pH KW - premature infants KW - probiotic SP - 179 EP - 183 JF - Journal of perinatal medicine JO - J Perinat Med VL - 48 IS - 2 N2 - Background To meet the nutritional needs of preterm infants, multicomponent nutrient fortifiers are added to human milk. The fortified human milk (FHM) product changes the physical and biochemical characteristics of the milk. We questioned whether such physical-chemical changes in the milk would alter intrinsic probiotic bacterial activity. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of osmolality and pH on the growth of probiotic bacterial species intrinsic to human milk. Methods Human milk samples (n = 26) were collected from mothers in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and stored at -20°C until analyzed. The samples were thawed and divided into three portions. Human milk fortifiers (HMFs) were added to two portions to prepare concentrations of FHM. The remaining portion was the unfortified control sample. Each sample was then divided into two parts. One part (baseline) was used to measure the osmolality and pH and plated on selective agar to enumerate the growth of lactobacilli and bifidobacteria species. The remaining part was incubated at 37°C for 24 h to further test bacterial integrity (post-incubation) and then the same measurements were made (osmolality, pH, bacterial colony counts). Results When compared with unfortified milk at baseline, osmolality increased and pH decreased significantly after the addition of HMFs. Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria colony counts did not differ among the groups pre-incubation. Post-incubation lactobacilli and bifidobacteria increased in all the groups. Conclusion The appropriate addition of HMFs differentially affected the osmolality and pH of the milk. These physical changes did not affect the growth of probiotic bacterial species. SN - 1619-3997 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31874102/Effects_of_human_milk_fortifier_properties_on_intrinsic_probiotic_bacteria L2 - https://www.degruyter.com/doi/10.1515/jpm-2019-0205 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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