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A community-based cross-sectional study of sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry.
Compr Psychiatry. 2020 02; 97:152154.CP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Internal migrant workers in the service industry are an important population in China, but the sleep quality of this population has not been well studied. The aims of the present study were to examine the prevalence of poor sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry, explore the risk factors associated with poor sleep quality, and assess the correlation between insomnia and psychiatric factors.

METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional study in Shenzhen, a migrant city in China. The respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method was used to recruit participants. Sociodemographic data and physical and psychiatric health status were investigated using questionnaires. In total, 1756 internal migrant workers completed the questionnaires. The Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess sleep quality, the General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scales were used to assess anxiety and depression, respectively. Mental resilience was assessed by the Chinese version of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors of poor sleep quality. A structural equation model (SEM) was used to analyze the relationships among sleep, anxiety, depression and resilience.

RESULTS

The prevalence of poor sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry was 25.4%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that participants who were older (OR = 1.452), worked >8 h per day (OR = 1.553), had experienced physical illness in the past 2 weeks (OR = 3.631) and had psychiatric problems such as anxiety (OR = 1.695-3.331) and depression (OR = 1.437) had an increased risk of poor sleep quality (P < 0.05). Moreover, the risk of poor sleep quality increased as the severity of anxiety increased. We also detected sex-specific risk factors and depression associated with sleep quality in women (OR = 1.480, P < 0.05) but not in men. The SEM showed that sleep was mutually correlated with anxiety (r = 0.277, P < 0.001), depression (r = 0.301, P < 0.001), and resilience (r = -0.103, P < 0.001). Resilience was mutually correlated with anxiety (r = -0.179, P < 0.001) and depression (r = -0.222, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Our study indicated that poor sleep quality was common among internal migrant workers in the service industry. Older age, long working hours, and poor physical and psychiatric health status contributed to poor sleep quality. Compared to males, sleep quality in females was more likely to be impacted by depression. Optimum working hours and physical and psychological health are critical to improving sleep quality. Interventions for ameliorating sleep quality might have different priorities for males and females.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, China.Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, China.Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, China.Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, China.Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, China.Shenzhen Kangning Hospital, Shenzhen Mental Health Center, China. Electronic address: liutbsz@sina.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31884329

Citation

Yang, Xi, et al. "A Community-based Cross-sectional Study of Sleep Quality Among Internal Migrant Workers in the Service Industry." Comprehensive Psychiatry, vol. 97, 2020, p. 152154.
Yang X, You L, Jin D, et al. A community-based cross-sectional study of sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry. Compr Psychiatry. 2020;97:152154.
Yang, X., You, L., Jin, D., Zou, X., Yang, H., & Liu, T. (2020). A community-based cross-sectional study of sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry. Comprehensive Psychiatry, 97, 152154. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.comppsych.2019.152154
Yang X, et al. A Community-based Cross-sectional Study of Sleep Quality Among Internal Migrant Workers in the Service Industry. Compr Psychiatry. 2020;97:152154. PubMed PMID: 31884329.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A community-based cross-sectional study of sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry. AU - Yang,Xi, AU - You,Liqin, AU - Jin,Dong, AU - Zou,Xiaowei, AU - Yang,Haichen, AU - Liu,Tiebang, Y1 - 2019/12/16/ PY - 2019/02/13/received PY - 2019/11/04/revised PY - 2019/12/07/accepted PY - 2019/12/31/pubmed PY - 2020/10/21/medline PY - 2019/12/30/entrez KW - Insomnia KW - Mental health KW - Migrant workers KW - Sleep quality SP - 152154 EP - 152154 JF - Comprehensive psychiatry JO - Compr Psychiatry VL - 97 N2 - BACKGROUND: Internal migrant workers in the service industry are an important population in China, but the sleep quality of this population has not been well studied. The aims of the present study were to examine the prevalence of poor sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry, explore the risk factors associated with poor sleep quality, and assess the correlation between insomnia and psychiatric factors. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in Shenzhen, a migrant city in China. The respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method was used to recruit participants. Sociodemographic data and physical and psychiatric health status were investigated using questionnaires. In total, 1756 internal migrant workers completed the questionnaires. The Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was used to assess sleep quality, the General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) scales were used to assess anxiety and depression, respectively. Mental resilience was assessed by the Chinese version of the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors of poor sleep quality. A structural equation model (SEM) was used to analyze the relationships among sleep, anxiety, depression and resilience. RESULTS: The prevalence of poor sleep quality among internal migrant workers in the service industry was 25.4%. Multivariate regression analysis revealed that participants who were older (OR = 1.452), worked >8 h per day (OR = 1.553), had experienced physical illness in the past 2 weeks (OR = 3.631) and had psychiatric problems such as anxiety (OR = 1.695-3.331) and depression (OR = 1.437) had an increased risk of poor sleep quality (P < 0.05). Moreover, the risk of poor sleep quality increased as the severity of anxiety increased. We also detected sex-specific risk factors and depression associated with sleep quality in women (OR = 1.480, P < 0.05) but not in men. The SEM showed that sleep was mutually correlated with anxiety (r = 0.277, P < 0.001), depression (r = 0.301, P < 0.001), and resilience (r = -0.103, P < 0.001). Resilience was mutually correlated with anxiety (r = -0.179, P < 0.001) and depression (r = -0.222, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicated that poor sleep quality was common among internal migrant workers in the service industry. Older age, long working hours, and poor physical and psychiatric health status contributed to poor sleep quality. Compared to males, sleep quality in females was more likely to be impacted by depression. Optimum working hours and physical and psychological health are critical to improving sleep quality. Interventions for ameliorating sleep quality might have different priorities for males and females. SN - 1532-8384 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31884329/A_community_based_cross_sectional_study_of_sleep_quality_among_internal_migrant_workers_in_the_service_industry_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0010-440X(19)30077-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -