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A Mosque-Based Qualitative Study on American Muslim Women's Organ Donation Beliefs.
Prog Transplant 2020; :1526924819893933PT

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Detailed studies on the associations between religious beliefs and organ donation attitudes among religious minorities remain wanting. Although Muslims appear to have low rates of support for donation, how these behaviors relate to religious frameworks requires further investigation.

METHODS

We sought to explore the relationship between religious beliefs (Islam) and organ donation attitudes through focus groups with 43 Muslim women from 5 Chicago-area mosques. Purposive selection of mosques generated near-equal representation of Arabs, South Asians, and African Americans, as well as diversity in education and income. Using the theory of planned behavior as our conceptual framework, we expanded the traditional normative domain to include religiously informed beliefs.

FINDINGS

We found that the relationship between religious beliefs and Muslim attitudes toward organ donation is more complex than commonly perceived. Regarding the Islamic ethicolegal permissibility of organ donation, participants expressed a range of normative beliefs. Furthermore, participants voiced concerns beyond religious permissibility, including anxieties over modesty violations during the donation process, as well as concerns about purported black market organ trade and medical risks to donors.

DISCUSSION

Given that participants raised religious, societal, and biomedical concerns regarding organ donation, our findings suggest that effective educational programs should involve nuanced curricula that teach to the plurality of Islamic ethicolegal opinions and discuss transplantation processes within the United States.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Initiative on Islam and Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.Initiative on Islam and Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Section of Emergency Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.Initiative on Islam and Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Section of Emergency Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31896303

Citation

Duivenbode, Rosie, et al. "A Mosque-Based Qualitative Study On American Muslim Women's Organ Donation Beliefs." Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), 2020, p. 1526924819893933.
Duivenbode R, Hall S, Padela AI. A Mosque-Based Qualitative Study on American Muslim Women's Organ Donation Beliefs. Prog Transplant. 2020.
Duivenbode, R., Hall, S., & Padela, A. I. (2020). A Mosque-Based Qualitative Study on American Muslim Women's Organ Donation Beliefs. Progress in Transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.), p. 1526924819893933. doi:10.1177/1526924819893933.
Duivenbode R, Hall S, Padela AI. A Mosque-Based Qualitative Study On American Muslim Women's Organ Donation Beliefs. Prog Transplant. 2020 Jan 3;1526924819893933. PubMed PMID: 31896303.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A Mosque-Based Qualitative Study on American Muslim Women's Organ Donation Beliefs. AU - Duivenbode,Rosie, AU - Hall,Stephen, AU - Padela,Aasim I, Y1 - 2020/01/03/ PY - 2020/1/4/entrez KW - Islam KW - community health KW - religion KW - theory of planned behavior KW - tissue and organ procurement SP - 1526924819893933 EP - 1526924819893933 JF - Progress in transplantation (Aliso Viejo, Calif.) JO - Prog Transplant N2 - INTRODUCTION: Detailed studies on the associations between religious beliefs and organ donation attitudes among religious minorities remain wanting. Although Muslims appear to have low rates of support for donation, how these behaviors relate to religious frameworks requires further investigation. METHODS: We sought to explore the relationship between religious beliefs (Islam) and organ donation attitudes through focus groups with 43 Muslim women from 5 Chicago-area mosques. Purposive selection of mosques generated near-equal representation of Arabs, South Asians, and African Americans, as well as diversity in education and income. Using the theory of planned behavior as our conceptual framework, we expanded the traditional normative domain to include religiously informed beliefs. FINDINGS: We found that the relationship between religious beliefs and Muslim attitudes toward organ donation is more complex than commonly perceived. Regarding the Islamic ethicolegal permissibility of organ donation, participants expressed a range of normative beliefs. Furthermore, participants voiced concerns beyond religious permissibility, including anxieties over modesty violations during the donation process, as well as concerns about purported black market organ trade and medical risks to donors. DISCUSSION: Given that participants raised religious, societal, and biomedical concerns regarding organ donation, our findings suggest that effective educational programs should involve nuanced curricula that teach to the plurality of Islamic ethicolegal opinions and discuss transplantation processes within the United States. SN - 2164-6708 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31896303/A_Mosque-Based_Qualitative_Study_on_American_Muslim_Women's_Organ_Donation_Beliefs L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1526924819893933?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -