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A brief review on the rising incidence of chronic kidney diseases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.
Physiol Int. 2019 Dec 01; 106(4):305-310.PI

Abstract

Chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) are the most common forms of kidney disease all around the world. The incidence of CKD is rising, which is mainly driven by population aging as well as by a global rise in hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic risk factors, particularly obesity and type-2 diabetes. The high mortality, morbidity of CKD, and the health care costs of the renal replacement therapy have led investigators to seek recent and potentially modifiable risk factors such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and the most common cause of chronic liver disease. It incorporates a spectrum of liver diseases ranging from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. On the basis of recent publications, the prevalence of CKD is significantly increased among patients with NAFLD, and the prevalence of NAFLD is also higher in CKD patients than in patients without NAFLD. These findings suggest that patients with NAFLD should be screened for CKD and patients with CKD and metabolic syndrome should be screened for NAFLD. Patients with NAFLD and CKD should be treated and followed up by a multidisciplinary team that involves specialists in hepatology, nephrology, diabetes, and cardiology.

Authors+Show Affiliations

2nd Department of Internal Medicine, Nephrological and Diabetological Centre, Clinical Centre, Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.2 Department of Internal Medicine, Nephrological and Diabetological Centre, Clinical Centre, Medical School, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31906711

Citation

Nagy, J, and T Kovács. "A Brief Review On the Rising Incidence of Chronic Kidney Diseases and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease." Physiology International, vol. 106, no. 4, 2019, pp. 305-310.
Nagy J, Kovács T. A brief review on the rising incidence of chronic kidney diseases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Physiol Int. 2019;106(4):305-310.
Nagy, J., & Kovács, T. (2019). A brief review on the rising incidence of chronic kidney diseases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Physiology International, 106(4), 305-310.
Nagy J, Kovács T. A Brief Review On the Rising Incidence of Chronic Kidney Diseases and Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease. Physiol Int. 2019 Dec 1;106(4):305-310. PubMed PMID: 31906711.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A brief review on the rising incidence of chronic kidney diseases and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. AU - Nagy,J, AU - Kovács,T, PY - 2020/1/8/entrez PY - 2020/1/8/pubmed PY - 2020/6/2/medline KW - cardiovascular risk KW - chronic kidney diseases KW - epiGFR KW - metabolic syndrome KW - non-alcoholic fatty liver disease SP - 305 EP - 310 JF - Physiology international JO - Physiol Int VL - 106 IS - 4 N2 - Chronic kidney diseases (CKDs) are the most common forms of kidney disease all around the world. The incidence of CKD is rising, which is mainly driven by population aging as well as by a global rise in hypertension, metabolic syndrome, and metabolic risk factors, particularly obesity and type-2 diabetes. The high mortality, morbidity of CKD, and the health care costs of the renal replacement therapy have led investigators to seek recent and potentially modifiable risk factors such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is the hepatic manifestation of metabolic syndrome and the most common cause of chronic liver disease. It incorporates a spectrum of liver diseases ranging from simple steatosis to steatohepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. On the basis of recent publications, the prevalence of CKD is significantly increased among patients with NAFLD, and the prevalence of NAFLD is also higher in CKD patients than in patients without NAFLD. These findings suggest that patients with NAFLD should be screened for CKD and patients with CKD and metabolic syndrome should be screened for NAFLD. Patients with NAFLD and CKD should be treated and followed up by a multidisciplinary team that involves specialists in hepatology, nephrology, diabetes, and cardiology. SN - 2498-602X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31906711/A_brief_review_on_the_rising_incidence_of_chronic_kidney_diseases_and_non_alcoholic_fatty_liver_disease_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -