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An optofluidic "tweeze-and-drag" cell stretcher in a microfluidic channel.
Lab Chip. 2020 02 07; 20(3):601-613.LC

Abstract

The mechanical properties of biological cells are utilized as an inherent, label-free biomarker to indicate physiological and pathological changes of cells. Although various optical and microfluidic techniques have been developed for cell mechanical characterization, there is still a strong demand for non-contact and continuous methods. Here, by combining optical and microfluidic techniques in a single desktop platform, we demonstrate an optofluidic cell stretcher based on a "tweeze-and-drag" mechanism using a periodically chopped, tightly focused laser beam as an optical tweezer to trap a cell temporarily and a flow-induced drag force to stretch the cell in a microfluidic channel transverse to the tweezer. Our method leverages the advantages of non-contact optical forces and a microfluidic flow for both cell stretching and continuous cell delivery. We demonstrate the stretcher for mechanical characterization of rabbit red blood cells (RBCs), with a throughput of ∼1 cell per s at a flow rate of 2.5 μl h-1 at a continuous-wave laser power of ∼25 mW at a wavelength of 1064 nm (chopped at 2 Hz). We estimate the spring constant of RBCs to be ∼14.9 μN m-1. Using the stretcher, we distinguish healthy RBCs and RBCs treated with glutaraldehyde at concentrations of 5 × 10-4% to 2.5 × 10-3%, with a strain-to-concentration sensitivity of ∼-1529. By increasing the optical power to ∼45 mW, we demonstrate cell-stretching under a higher flow rate of 4 μl h-1, with a higher throughput of ∼1.5 cells per s and a higher sensitivity of ∼-2457. Our technique shows promise for applications in the fields of healthcare monitoring and biomechanical studies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Photonic Device Laboratory, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong SAR, China. eeawpoon@ust.hk.Photonic Device Laboratory, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong SAR, China. eeawpoon@ust.hk.Photonic Device Laboratory, Department of Electronic and Computer Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Hong Kong SAR, China. eeawpoon@ust.hk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31909404

Citation

Yao, Zhanshi, et al. "An Optofluidic "tweeze-and-drag" Cell Stretcher in a Microfluidic Channel." Lab On a Chip, vol. 20, no. 3, 2020, pp. 601-613.
Yao Z, Kwan CC, Poon AW. An optofluidic "tweeze-and-drag" cell stretcher in a microfluidic channel. Lab Chip. 2020;20(3):601-613.
Yao, Z., Kwan, C. C., & Poon, A. W. (2020). An optofluidic "tweeze-and-drag" cell stretcher in a microfluidic channel. Lab On a Chip, 20(3), 601-613. https://doi.org/10.1039/c9lc01026b
Yao Z, Kwan CC, Poon AW. An Optofluidic "tweeze-and-drag" Cell Stretcher in a Microfluidic Channel. Lab Chip. 2020 02 7;20(3):601-613. PubMed PMID: 31909404.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - An optofluidic "tweeze-and-drag" cell stretcher in a microfluidic channel. AU - Yao,Zhanshi, AU - Kwan,Ching Chi, AU - Poon,Andrew W, Y1 - 2020/01/07/ PY - 2020/1/8/pubmed PY - 2020/1/8/medline PY - 2020/1/8/entrez SP - 601 EP - 613 JF - Lab on a chip JO - Lab Chip VL - 20 IS - 3 N2 - The mechanical properties of biological cells are utilized as an inherent, label-free biomarker to indicate physiological and pathological changes of cells. Although various optical and microfluidic techniques have been developed for cell mechanical characterization, there is still a strong demand for non-contact and continuous methods. Here, by combining optical and microfluidic techniques in a single desktop platform, we demonstrate an optofluidic cell stretcher based on a "tweeze-and-drag" mechanism using a periodically chopped, tightly focused laser beam as an optical tweezer to trap a cell temporarily and a flow-induced drag force to stretch the cell in a microfluidic channel transverse to the tweezer. Our method leverages the advantages of non-contact optical forces and a microfluidic flow for both cell stretching and continuous cell delivery. We demonstrate the stretcher for mechanical characterization of rabbit red blood cells (RBCs), with a throughput of ∼1 cell per s at a flow rate of 2.5 μl h-1 at a continuous-wave laser power of ∼25 mW at a wavelength of 1064 nm (chopped at 2 Hz). We estimate the spring constant of RBCs to be ∼14.9 μN m-1. Using the stretcher, we distinguish healthy RBCs and RBCs treated with glutaraldehyde at concentrations of 5 × 10-4% to 2.5 × 10-3%, with a strain-to-concentration sensitivity of ∼-1529. By increasing the optical power to ∼45 mW, we demonstrate cell-stretching under a higher flow rate of 4 μl h-1, with a higher throughput of ∼1.5 cells per s and a higher sensitivity of ∼-2457. Our technique shows promise for applications in the fields of healthcare monitoring and biomechanical studies. SN - 1473-0189 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31909404/An_optofluidic_"tweeze-and-drag"_cell_stretcher_in_a_microfluidic_channel L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c9lc01026b DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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