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Maternal disease and gasotransmitters.
Nitric Oxide. 2020 03 01; 96:1-12.NO

Abstract

The three known gasotransmitters, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide are involved in key processes throughout pregnancy. Gasotransmitters are known to impact on smooth muscle tone, regulation of immune responses, and oxidative state of cells and their component molecules. Failure of the systems that tightly regulate gasotransmitter production and downstream effects are thought to contribute to common maternal diseases such as preeclampsia and preterm birth. Normal pregnancy-related changes in uterine blood flow depend heavily on gasotransmitter signaling. In preeclampsia, endothelial dysfunction is a major contributor to aberrant gasotransmitter signaling, resulting in hypertension after 20 weeks gestation. Maintenance of pregnancy to term also requires gasotransmitter-mediated uterine quiescence. As the appropriate signals for parturition occur, regulation of gasotransmitter signaling must work in concert with those endocrine signals in order for appropriate labor and delivery timing. Like preeclampsia, preterm birth may have origins in abnormal gasotransmitter signaling. We review the evidence for the involvement of gasotransmitters in preeclampsia and preterm birth, as well as mechanistic and molecular signaling targets.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Perinatal Research Laboratories, Dept Ob/ Gyn, UW - Madison, Madison, WI, 53715, USA.Perinatal Research Laboratories, Dept Ob/ Gyn, UW - Madison, Madison, WI, 53715, USA.Perinatal Research Laboratories, Dept Ob/ Gyn, UW - Madison, Madison, WI, 53715, USA. Electronic address: dsboeldt@wisc.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31911124

Citation

Rengarajan, Aishwarya, et al. "Maternal Disease and Gasotransmitters." Nitric Oxide : Biology and Chemistry, vol. 96, 2020, pp. 1-12.
Rengarajan A, Mauro AK, Boeldt DS. Maternal disease and gasotransmitters. Nitric Oxide. 2020;96:1-12.
Rengarajan, A., Mauro, A. K., & Boeldt, D. S. (2020). Maternal disease and gasotransmitters. Nitric Oxide : Biology and Chemistry, 96, 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.niox.2020.01.001
Rengarajan A, Mauro AK, Boeldt DS. Maternal Disease and Gasotransmitters. Nitric Oxide. 2020 03 1;96:1-12. PubMed PMID: 31911124.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maternal disease and gasotransmitters. AU - Rengarajan,Aishwarya, AU - Mauro,Amanda K, AU - Boeldt,Derek S, Y1 - 2020/01/03/ PY - 2019/05/21/received PY - 2019/12/20/revised PY - 2020/01/02/accepted PY - 2020/1/9/pubmed PY - 2020/11/24/medline PY - 2020/1/9/entrez KW - Carbon monoxide KW - Hydrogen sulfide KW - Nitric oxide KW - Preeclampsia KW - Pregnancy KW - Preterm birth SP - 1 EP - 12 JF - Nitric oxide : biology and chemistry JO - Nitric Oxide VL - 96 N2 - The three known gasotransmitters, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen sulfide are involved in key processes throughout pregnancy. Gasotransmitters are known to impact on smooth muscle tone, regulation of immune responses, and oxidative state of cells and their component molecules. Failure of the systems that tightly regulate gasotransmitter production and downstream effects are thought to contribute to common maternal diseases such as preeclampsia and preterm birth. Normal pregnancy-related changes in uterine blood flow depend heavily on gasotransmitter signaling. In preeclampsia, endothelial dysfunction is a major contributor to aberrant gasotransmitter signaling, resulting in hypertension after 20 weeks gestation. Maintenance of pregnancy to term also requires gasotransmitter-mediated uterine quiescence. As the appropriate signals for parturition occur, regulation of gasotransmitter signaling must work in concert with those endocrine signals in order for appropriate labor and delivery timing. Like preeclampsia, preterm birth may have origins in abnormal gasotransmitter signaling. We review the evidence for the involvement of gasotransmitters in preeclampsia and preterm birth, as well as mechanistic and molecular signaling targets. SN - 1089-8611 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31911124/Maternal_disease_and_gasotransmitters_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1089-8603(19)30167-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -