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A National Epidemiologic Profile of Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Supportive Childhood Relationships: Group Differences in Predicted Trends and Associations.
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2020 08; 7(4):660-670.JR

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are common in the USA and associated with multiple health sequelae. Physical intimate partner violence (IPV) is a type of revictimization that some adults with ACEs may be more prone to. Positive and supportive childhood environments may buffer the effects of ACEs, but little is known about the differential associations between physical IPV and ACEs and supportive childhood environments. We sought to illustrate racial/ethnic and gender differences in the adjusted predicted probability of physical IPV across multiple ACE and supportive childhood scores.

METHODS

We used multivariate linear regression to model the predicted probability of experiencing physical IPV across ACE (physical, psychological, sexual, household environment, mother's abuse) and supportive childhood scores in a national sample (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III, 2012-2013, n = 35,614). Data analyses were conducted in 2019.

RESULTS

American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women demonstrated the highest proportion of experiencing physical IPV (21%). AI/AN men had the highest mean physical ACE score (1.6/4), while AI/AN women had the highest mean scores for all other ACE typologies. ACE scores were positively associated with predicted physical IPV among women, and among AI/AN women in particular. Supportive childhood scores were negatively associated with predicted physical IPV primarily among women.

CONCLUSION

Physical IPV and ACEs are exceedingly high among AI/AN women. A better understanding of differential associations between childhood experiences and IPV is needed to more effectively tailor childhood and family-based health promotion strategies among multiple diverse communities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Health Equity Research, Northern Arizona University, 1395 South Knoles Drive, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA. george.pro@nau.edu.Center for Health Equity Research, Department of Health Sciences, Northern Arizona University, 1395 South Knoles Drive, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA.Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice, Northern Arizona University, 5 East McConnell Drive, Flagstaff, AZ, USA.Center for Health Equity Research, Northern Arizona University, 1395 South Knoles Drive, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA.Center for Health Equity Research, Department of Health Sciences, Northern Arizona University, 1395 South Knoles Drive, Flagstaff, AZ, 86011, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31912443

Citation

Pro, George, et al. "A National Epidemiologic Profile of Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Supportive Childhood Relationships: Group Differences in Predicted Trends and Associations." Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, vol. 7, no. 4, 2020, pp. 660-670.
Pro G, Camplain R, de Heer B, et al. A National Epidemiologic Profile of Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Supportive Childhood Relationships: Group Differences in Predicted Trends and Associations. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2020;7(4):660-670.
Pro, G., Camplain, R., de Heer, B., Chief, C., & Teufel-Shone, N. (2020). A National Epidemiologic Profile of Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Supportive Childhood Relationships: Group Differences in Predicted Trends and Associations. Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities, 7(4), 660-670. https://doi.org/10.1007/s40615-019-00696-4
Pro G, et al. A National Epidemiologic Profile of Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Supportive Childhood Relationships: Group Differences in Predicted Trends and Associations. J Racial Ethn Health Disparities. 2020;7(4):660-670. PubMed PMID: 31912443.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A National Epidemiologic Profile of Physical Intimate Partner Violence, Adverse Childhood Experiences, and Supportive Childhood Relationships: Group Differences in Predicted Trends and Associations. AU - Pro,George, AU - Camplain,Ricky, AU - de Heer,Brooke, AU - Chief,Carmenlita, AU - Teufel-Shone,Nicolette, Y1 - 2020/01/07/ PY - 2019/09/16/received PY - 2019/12/30/accepted PY - 2019/12/20/revised PY - 2020/1/9/pubmed PY - 2021/8/24/medline PY - 2020/1/9/entrez KW - Adverse childhood experiences KW - Health disparities KW - Physical intimate partner violence KW - Positive childhood experiences SP - 660 EP - 670 JF - Journal of racial and ethnic health disparities JO - J Racial Ethn Health Disparities VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are common in the USA and associated with multiple health sequelae. Physical intimate partner violence (IPV) is a type of revictimization that some adults with ACEs may be more prone to. Positive and supportive childhood environments may buffer the effects of ACEs, but little is known about the differential associations between physical IPV and ACEs and supportive childhood environments. We sought to illustrate racial/ethnic and gender differences in the adjusted predicted probability of physical IPV across multiple ACE and supportive childhood scores. METHODS: We used multivariate linear regression to model the predicted probability of experiencing physical IPV across ACE (physical, psychological, sexual, household environment, mother's abuse) and supportive childhood scores in a national sample (National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions-III, 2012-2013, n = 35,614). Data analyses were conducted in 2019. RESULTS: American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) women demonstrated the highest proportion of experiencing physical IPV (21%). AI/AN men had the highest mean physical ACE score (1.6/4), while AI/AN women had the highest mean scores for all other ACE typologies. ACE scores were positively associated with predicted physical IPV among women, and among AI/AN women in particular. Supportive childhood scores were negatively associated with predicted physical IPV primarily among women. CONCLUSION: Physical IPV and ACEs are exceedingly high among AI/AN women. A better understanding of differential associations between childhood experiences and IPV is needed to more effectively tailor childhood and family-based health promotion strategies among multiple diverse communities. SN - 2196-8837 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31912443/A_National_Epidemiologic_Profile_of_Physical_Intimate_Partner_Violence_Adverse_Childhood_Experiences_and_Supportive_Childhood_Relationships:_Group_Differences_in_Predicted_Trends_and_Associations_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/31912443/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -