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Dietary effect of low fish meal aquafeed on gut microbiota in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) at different growth stages.
Microbiologyopen. 2020 03; 9(3):e992.M

Abstract

This study was conducted to investigate the long-term effect of a low fish meal (FM) diet comprising plant-based protein sources (PPS) on changes of gut microbial diversity in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) over the course of life. Two experimental diets were prepared to contain 74% FM (control) or 52% FM with 22% PPS (30% FM replacement, FM30). Fish were fed one of the two experimental diets for 8 months, and we collected the midgut contents to analyze the gut bacterial community by Illumina MiSeq based on the metagenomic sequences in the V3-V4 regions of 16S rRNA. We found that there were nine dominant phyla, which in turn presented Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria as the three major phyla in the gut microbiota of the flounder. At genus level, the dominant genera were Delftia, Prevotella, and Chthoniobacter at the juvenile stage (below 100 g/fish); Chthoniobacter, Bacillus, and Bradyrhizobium at the grower stage (400 g/fish); Chthoniobacter, Bacillus, and Delftia at the subadult stage (800 g/fish); and Lactobacillus and Prevotella at the adult stage (over 1,000 g/fish). The microbial diversity in olive flounders arched from the juvenile and subadult stage and reached a plateau thereafter. The fish fed the FM30 diet significantly had an increased abundance of Lactobacillus and Photobacterium and had less abundance of Prevotella and Paraprevotella than the control. However, the effect of dietary PPS was not significant on total microbial richness, indicating no negative effect as feed sources on the intestinal microbiota in olive flounder. These results indicate that the life stage of olive flounder is more important in modulating intestinal microbiota than is the diet. It could also be concluded that dietary PPS might be used as a potential fish meal alternative without any compromising effects on microbial diversity of olive flounder for long-term feeding.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Biological Resources, Jiangxi Academy of Sciences, Nanchang, China. Department of Animal Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.Aquafeed Research Center, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Pohang, Korea.Department of Animal Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.Department of Animal Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.Aquafeed Research Center, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Pohang, Korea.Aquafeed Research Center, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Pohang, Korea.Aquaculture Management Division, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Busan, Korea.Aquaculture Management Division, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Busan, Korea.Inland Aquaculture Research Center, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Changwon, Korea.Department of Animal Science and Technology, Konkuk University, Seoul, Korea.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31925997

Citation

Niu, Kai-Min, et al. "Dietary Effect of Low Fish Meal Aquafeed On Gut Microbiota in Olive Flounder (Paralichthys Olivaceus) at Different Growth Stages." MicrobiologyOpen, vol. 9, no. 3, 2020, pp. e992.
Niu KM, Lee BJ, Kothari D, et al. Dietary effect of low fish meal aquafeed on gut microbiota in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) at different growth stages. Microbiologyopen. 2020;9(3):e992.
Niu, K. M., Lee, B. J., Kothari, D., Lee, W. D., Hur, S. W., Lim, S. G., Kim, K. W., Kim, K. D., Kim, N. N., & Kim, S. K. (2020). Dietary effect of low fish meal aquafeed on gut microbiota in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) at different growth stages. MicrobiologyOpen, 9(3), e992. https://doi.org/10.1002/mbo3.992
Niu KM, et al. Dietary Effect of Low Fish Meal Aquafeed On Gut Microbiota in Olive Flounder (Paralichthys Olivaceus) at Different Growth Stages. Microbiologyopen. 2020;9(3):e992. PubMed PMID: 31925997.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary effect of low fish meal aquafeed on gut microbiota in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) at different growth stages. AU - Niu,Kai-Min, AU - Lee,Bong-Joo, AU - Kothari,Damini, AU - Lee,Woo-Do, AU - Hur,Sang-Woo, AU - Lim,Sang-Gu, AU - Kim,Kang-Woong, AU - Kim,Kyoung-Duck, AU - Kim,Na-Na, AU - Kim,Soo-Ki, Y1 - 2020/01/11/ PY - 2019/08/01/received PY - 2019/12/04/revised PY - 2019/12/16/accepted PY - 2020/1/12/pubmed PY - 2021/1/20/medline PY - 2020/1/12/entrez KW - growth stage KW - gut microbiota KW - low fish meal KW - next-generation sequencing KW - olive flounder SP - e992 EP - e992 JF - MicrobiologyOpen JO - Microbiologyopen VL - 9 IS - 3 N2 - This study was conducted to investigate the long-term effect of a low fish meal (FM) diet comprising plant-based protein sources (PPS) on changes of gut microbial diversity in olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) over the course of life. Two experimental diets were prepared to contain 74% FM (control) or 52% FM with 22% PPS (30% FM replacement, FM30). Fish were fed one of the two experimental diets for 8 months, and we collected the midgut contents to analyze the gut bacterial community by Illumina MiSeq based on the metagenomic sequences in the V3-V4 regions of 16S rRNA. We found that there were nine dominant phyla, which in turn presented Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Actinobacteria as the three major phyla in the gut microbiota of the flounder. At genus level, the dominant genera were Delftia, Prevotella, and Chthoniobacter at the juvenile stage (below 100 g/fish); Chthoniobacter, Bacillus, and Bradyrhizobium at the grower stage (400 g/fish); Chthoniobacter, Bacillus, and Delftia at the subadult stage (800 g/fish); and Lactobacillus and Prevotella at the adult stage (over 1,000 g/fish). The microbial diversity in olive flounders arched from the juvenile and subadult stage and reached a plateau thereafter. The fish fed the FM30 diet significantly had an increased abundance of Lactobacillus and Photobacterium and had less abundance of Prevotella and Paraprevotella than the control. However, the effect of dietary PPS was not significant on total microbial richness, indicating no negative effect as feed sources on the intestinal microbiota in olive flounder. These results indicate that the life stage of olive flounder is more important in modulating intestinal microbiota than is the diet. It could also be concluded that dietary PPS might be used as a potential fish meal alternative without any compromising effects on microbial diversity of olive flounder for long-term feeding. SN - 2045-8827 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31925997/Dietary_effect_of_low_fish_meal_aquafeed_on_gut_microbiota_in_olive_flounder__Paralichthys_olivaceus__at_different_growth_stages_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mbo3.992 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -