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The first pterosaur basihyal, shedding light on the evolution and function of pterosaur hyoid apparatuses.
PeerJ. 2020; 8:e8292.P

Abstract

The pterosaur is the first known vertebrate clade to achieve powered flight. Its hyoid apparatus shows a simplification similar to that of birds, although samples of the apparatus are rare, limiting the ability to make an accurate determination. In this study we reveal a new pterosaur specimen, including the first definite basihyal. Through the comparison of pterosaur hyoids, a trend has been discovered for the shortened hyoid relative to the length of the skull, indicating a diminished role of lingual retraction during the evolution of the pterosaur. The new material, possibly from a gallodactylid Gladocephaloideus, represents one of the least effective lingual retractions in all pterosaurs. Based on the structure of an elongated ceratobranchial and retroarticular process on mandibles, the function of the Y-shaped istiodactylid tongue bone is similar to those of scavenger crows rather than chameleons, which is consistent with the interpretation of the scavenging behavior of this taxon. More fossil samples are needed for further study on the function of other pterosaur hyoids.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, China. CAS Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Beijing, China.Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, China. CAS Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Beijing, China.College of Earth Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, China. Laboratório de Paleontologia, Universidade Regional do Cariri, Crato, Ceará, Brazil.Key Laboratory of Vertebrate Evolution and Human Origins, Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing, China. CAS Center for Excellence in Life and Paleoenvironment, Beijing, China. College of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of CAS, Beijing, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31934505

Citation

Jiang, Shunxing, et al. "The First Pterosaur Basihyal, Shedding Light On the Evolution and Function of Pterosaur Hyoid Apparatuses." PeerJ, vol. 8, 2020, pp. e8292.
Jiang S, Li Z, Cheng X, et al. The first pterosaur basihyal, shedding light on the evolution and function of pterosaur hyoid apparatuses. PeerJ. 2020;8:e8292.
Jiang, S., Li, Z., Cheng, X., & Wang, X. (2020). The first pterosaur basihyal, shedding light on the evolution and function of pterosaur hyoid apparatuses. PeerJ, 8, e8292. https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.8292
Jiang S, et al. The First Pterosaur Basihyal, Shedding Light On the Evolution and Function of Pterosaur Hyoid Apparatuses. PeerJ. 2020;8:e8292. PubMed PMID: 31934505.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The first pterosaur basihyal, shedding light on the evolution and function of pterosaur hyoid apparatuses. AU - Jiang,Shunxing, AU - Li,Zhiheng, AU - Cheng,Xin, AU - Wang,Xiaolin, Y1 - 2020/01/06/ PY - 2019/10/15/received PY - 2019/11/25/accepted PY - 2020/1/15/entrez PY - 2020/1/15/pubmed PY - 2020/1/15/medline KW - Basihyal KW - China KW - Evolution KW - Function KW - Hyoid apparatus KW - Pterosaurs KW - Yixian Formation SP - e8292 EP - e8292 JF - PeerJ JO - PeerJ VL - 8 N2 - The pterosaur is the first known vertebrate clade to achieve powered flight. Its hyoid apparatus shows a simplification similar to that of birds, although samples of the apparatus are rare, limiting the ability to make an accurate determination. In this study we reveal a new pterosaur specimen, including the first definite basihyal. Through the comparison of pterosaur hyoids, a trend has been discovered for the shortened hyoid relative to the length of the skull, indicating a diminished role of lingual retraction during the evolution of the pterosaur. The new material, possibly from a gallodactylid Gladocephaloideus, represents one of the least effective lingual retractions in all pterosaurs. Based on the structure of an elongated ceratobranchial and retroarticular process on mandibles, the function of the Y-shaped istiodactylid tongue bone is similar to those of scavenger crows rather than chameleons, which is consistent with the interpretation of the scavenging behavior of this taxon. More fossil samples are needed for further study on the function of other pterosaur hyoids. SN - 2167-8359 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31934505/The_first_pterosaur_basihyal,_shedding_light_on_the_evolution_and_function_of_pterosaur_hyoid_apparatuses L2 - https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.8292 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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