Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Predicting dissolution and transformation of inhaled nanoparticles in the lung using abiotic flow cells: The case of barium sulfate.
Sci Rep 2020; 10(1):458SR

Abstract

Barium sulfate (BaSO4) was considered to be poorly-soluble and of low toxicity, but BaSO4 NM-220 showed a surprisingly short retention after intratracheal instillation in rat lungs, and incorporation of Ba within the bones. Here we show that static abiotic dissolution cannot rationalize this result, whereas two dynamic abiotic dissolution systems (one flow-through and one flow-by) indicated 50% dissolution after 5 to 6 days at non-saturating conditions regardless of flow orientation, which is close to the in vivo half-time of 9.6 days. Non-equilibrium conditions were thus essential to simulate in vivo biodissolution. Instead of shrinking from 32 nm to 23 nm (to match the mass loss to ions), TEM scans of particles retrieved from flow-cells showed an increase to 40 nm. Such transformation suggested either material transport through interfacial contact or Ostwald ripening at super-saturating conditions and was also observed in vivo inside macrophages by high-resolution TEM following 12 months inhalation exposure. The abiotic flow cells thus adequately predicted the overall pulmonary biopersistence of the particles that was mediated by non-equilibrium dissolution and recrystallization. The present methodology for dissolution and transformation fills a high priority gap in nanomaterial hazard assessment and is proposed for the implementation of grouping and read-across by dissolution rates.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department Experimental Toxicology and Ecology and Department Material Physics, BASF SE, 67056, Ludwigshafen, Germany. Institute of Pharmacy, Faculty of Biology, Chemistry & Pharmacy, Freie Universität Berlin, 14195, Berlin, Germany.National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, Ohio, 45226, USA.Department Experimental Toxicology and Ecology and Department Material Physics, BASF SE, 67056, Ludwigshafen, Germany. Biopharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Saarland University, 66123, Saarbrücken, Germany.University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.Department Experimental Toxicology and Ecology and Department Material Physics, BASF SE, 67056, Ludwigshafen, Germany.Department Experimental Toxicology and Ecology and Department Material Physics, BASF SE, 67056, Ludwigshafen, Germany.IBE R&D Institute for Lung Health gGmbH, Mendelstr. 11, 48149, Münster, Germany.University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA.University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA. alison_elder@urmc.rochester.edu.Department Experimental Toxicology and Ecology and Department Material Physics, BASF SE, 67056, Ludwigshafen, Germany. wendel.wohlleben@basf.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31949204

Citation

Keller, Johannes G., et al. "Predicting Dissolution and Transformation of Inhaled Nanoparticles in the Lung Using Abiotic Flow Cells: the Case of Barium Sulfate." Scientific Reports, vol. 10, no. 1, 2020, p. 458.
Keller JG, Graham UM, Koltermann-Jülly J, et al. Predicting dissolution and transformation of inhaled nanoparticles in the lung using abiotic flow cells: The case of barium sulfate. Sci Rep. 2020;10(1):458.
Keller, J. G., Graham, U. M., Koltermann-Jülly, J., Gelein, R., Ma-Hock, L., Landsiedel, R., ... Wohlleben, W. (2020). Predicting dissolution and transformation of inhaled nanoparticles in the lung using abiotic flow cells: The case of barium sulfate. Scientific Reports, 10(1), p. 458. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-56872-3.
Keller JG, et al. Predicting Dissolution and Transformation of Inhaled Nanoparticles in the Lung Using Abiotic Flow Cells: the Case of Barium Sulfate. Sci Rep. 2020 Jan 16;10(1):458. PubMed PMID: 31949204.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Predicting dissolution and transformation of inhaled nanoparticles in the lung using abiotic flow cells: The case of barium sulfate. AU - Keller,Johannes G, AU - Graham,Uschi M, AU - Koltermann-Jülly,Johanna, AU - Gelein,Robert, AU - Ma-Hock,Lan, AU - Landsiedel,Robert, AU - Wiemann,Martin, AU - Oberdörster,Günter, AU - Elder,Alison, AU - Wohlleben,Wendel, Y1 - 2020/01/16/ PY - 2019/01/28/received PY - 2019/12/17/accepted PY - 2020/1/18/entrez PY - 2020/1/18/pubmed PY - 2020/1/18/medline SP - 458 EP - 458 JF - Scientific reports JO - Sci Rep VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - Barium sulfate (BaSO4) was considered to be poorly-soluble and of low toxicity, but BaSO4 NM-220 showed a surprisingly short retention after intratracheal instillation in rat lungs, and incorporation of Ba within the bones. Here we show that static abiotic dissolution cannot rationalize this result, whereas two dynamic abiotic dissolution systems (one flow-through and one flow-by) indicated 50% dissolution after 5 to 6 days at non-saturating conditions regardless of flow orientation, which is close to the in vivo half-time of 9.6 days. Non-equilibrium conditions were thus essential to simulate in vivo biodissolution. Instead of shrinking from 32 nm to 23 nm (to match the mass loss to ions), TEM scans of particles retrieved from flow-cells showed an increase to 40 nm. Such transformation suggested either material transport through interfacial contact or Ostwald ripening at super-saturating conditions and was also observed in vivo inside macrophages by high-resolution TEM following 12 months inhalation exposure. The abiotic flow cells thus adequately predicted the overall pulmonary biopersistence of the particles that was mediated by non-equilibrium dissolution and recrystallization. The present methodology for dissolution and transformation fills a high priority gap in nanomaterial hazard assessment and is proposed for the implementation of grouping and read-across by dissolution rates. SN - 2045-2322 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31949204/Predicting_dissolution_and_transformation_of_inhaled_nanoparticles_in_the_lung_using_abiotic_flow_cells:_The_case_of_barium_sulfate L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-56872-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -