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Dose-Dependent Behavioral and Antioxidant Effects of Quercetin and Methanolic and Acetonic Extracts from Heterotheca inuloides on Several Rat Tissues following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus.
Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2019; 2019:5287507.OM

Abstract

Kainic acid (KA) has been used to study the neurotoxicity induced after status epilepticus (SE) due to activation of excitatory amino acids with neuronal damage. Medicinal plants can protect against damage caused by KA-induced SE; in particular, organic extracts of Heterotheca inuloides and its metabolite quercetin display antioxidant activity and act as hepatoprotective agents. However, it is unknown whether these properties can protect against the hyperexcitability underlying the damage caused by KA-induced SE. Our aim was to study the protective effects (with regard to behavior and antioxidant activity) of administration of natural products methanolic (ME) and acetonic (AE) extracts and quercetin (Q) from H. inuloides at doses of 30 mg/kg (ME30, AE30, and Q30 groups), 100 mg/kg (ME100, AE100, and Q100 groups), and 300 mg/kg (ME300, AE300, and Q300 groups) against damage in brain regions of male Wistar rats treated with KA. We found dose-dependent effects on behavioral and biochemical studies in the all-natural product groups vs. the control group, with decreases in seizure severity (Racine's scale) and increases in seizure latency (p < 0.05 in the ME100, AE100, Q100, and Q300 groups and p < 0.01 in the AE300 and ME300 groups); on lipid peroxidation and carbonylated proteins in all brain tissues (p < 0.0001); and on GPx, GR, CAT, and SOD activities with all the treatments vs. KA (p ≤ 0.001). In addition, there were strong negative correlations between carbonyl levels and latency in the group treated with KA and in the group treated with methanolic extract in the presence of KA (r = -0.9919, p = 0.0084). This evidence suggests that organic extracts and quercetin from H. inuloides exert anticonvulsant effects via direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Chemistry Institute, UNAM, Mexico City 04150, Mexico.Department of Biology, Faculty of Chemistry, UNAM, Mexico City 04150, Mexico.Service of Endocrinology, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Pharmacology, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Pharmacology, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Subdirection of Clinical Research, National Institute of Psychiatry, Mexico City 14370, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico. Faculty of Chemistry, Autonomous University of Sinaloa, Sinaloa 80000, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Department of Comparative Biology, Faculty of Sciences, UNAM, Mexico City 04150, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.Laboratory of Neuroscience, National Institute of Pediatrics, Mexico City 04530, Mexico.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31949879

Citation

Carmona-Aparicio, Liliana, et al. "Dose-Dependent Behavioral and Antioxidant Effects of Quercetin and Methanolic and Acetonic Extracts From Heterotheca Inuloides On Several Rat Tissues Following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus." Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol. 2019, 2019, p. 5287507.
Carmona-Aparicio L, Cárdenas-Rodríguez N, Delgado-Lamas G, et al. Dose-Dependent Behavioral and Antioxidant Effects of Quercetin and Methanolic and Acetonic Extracts from Heterotheca inuloides on Several Rat Tissues following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2019;2019:5287507.
Carmona-Aparicio, L., Cárdenas-Rodríguez, N., Delgado-Lamas, G., Pedraza-Chaverri, J., Montesinos-Correa, H., Rivera-Espinosa, L., Torres-Espíndola, L. M., Hernández, M. E., López-Aceves, T., Pérez-Lozano, D. L., Hernández-Velasco, N., Narváez-Delgado, O., Gutiérrez-Alejandre, A. P., Fuentes-Mejía, M., Bello-Robles, E., Martínez-Ponce, K., Sánchez-Valle, V., Sampieri, A., Granados-Rojas, L., & Coballase-Urrutia, E. (2019). Dose-Dependent Behavioral and Antioxidant Effects of Quercetin and Methanolic and Acetonic Extracts from Heterotheca inuloides on Several Rat Tissues following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus. Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, 2019, 5287507. https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/5287507
Carmona-Aparicio L, et al. Dose-Dependent Behavioral and Antioxidant Effects of Quercetin and Methanolic and Acetonic Extracts From Heterotheca Inuloides On Several Rat Tissues Following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus. Oxid Med Cell Longev. 2019;2019:5287507. PubMed PMID: 31949879.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dose-Dependent Behavioral and Antioxidant Effects of Quercetin and Methanolic and Acetonic Extracts from Heterotheca inuloides on Several Rat Tissues following Kainic Acid-Induced Status Epilepticus. AU - Carmona-Aparicio,Liliana, AU - Cárdenas-Rodríguez,Noemí, AU - Delgado-Lamas,Guillermo, AU - Pedraza-Chaverri,José, AU - Montesinos-Correa,Hortencia, AU - Rivera-Espinosa,Liliana, AU - Torres-Espíndola,Luz María, AU - Hernández,Maria Eugenia, AU - López-Aceves,Teresita, AU - Pérez-Lozano,Diana Leticia, AU - Hernández-Velasco,Natalia, AU - Narváez-Delgado,Omar, AU - Gutiérrez-Alejandre,Ana Paulina, AU - Fuentes-Mejía,Monserrat, AU - Bello-Robles,Edith, AU - Martínez-Ponce,Karina, AU - Sánchez-Valle,Vicente, AU - Sampieri,Aristides,3rd AU - Granados-Rojas,Leticia, AU - Coballase-Urrutia,Elvia, Y1 - 2019/12/19/ PY - 2019/09/05/received PY - 2019/11/12/revised PY - 2019/11/25/accepted PY - 2020/1/18/entrez PY - 2020/1/18/pubmed PY - 2020/7/1/medline SP - 5287507 EP - 5287507 JF - Oxidative medicine and cellular longevity JO - Oxid Med Cell Longev VL - 2019 N2 - Kainic acid (KA) has been used to study the neurotoxicity induced after status epilepticus (SE) due to activation of excitatory amino acids with neuronal damage. Medicinal plants can protect against damage caused by KA-induced SE; in particular, organic extracts of Heterotheca inuloides and its metabolite quercetin display antioxidant activity and act as hepatoprotective agents. However, it is unknown whether these properties can protect against the hyperexcitability underlying the damage caused by KA-induced SE. Our aim was to study the protective effects (with regard to behavior and antioxidant activity) of administration of natural products methanolic (ME) and acetonic (AE) extracts and quercetin (Q) from H. inuloides at doses of 30 mg/kg (ME30, AE30, and Q30 groups), 100 mg/kg (ME100, AE100, and Q100 groups), and 300 mg/kg (ME300, AE300, and Q300 groups) against damage in brain regions of male Wistar rats treated with KA. We found dose-dependent effects on behavioral and biochemical studies in the all-natural product groups vs. the control group, with decreases in seizure severity (Racine's scale) and increases in seizure latency (p < 0.05 in the ME100, AE100, Q100, and Q300 groups and p < 0.01 in the AE300 and ME300 groups); on lipid peroxidation and carbonylated proteins in all brain tissues (p < 0.0001); and on GPx, GR, CAT, and SOD activities with all the treatments vs. KA (p ≤ 0.001). In addition, there were strong negative correlations between carbonyl levels and latency in the group treated with KA and in the group treated with methanolic extract in the presence of KA (r = -0.9919, p = 0.0084). This evidence suggests that organic extracts and quercetin from H. inuloides exert anticonvulsant effects via direct scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and modulation of antioxidant enzyme activity. SN - 1942-0994 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31949879/Dose_Dependent_Behavioral_and_Antioxidant_Effects_of_Quercetin_and_Methanolic_and_Acetonic_Extracts_from_Heterotheca_inuloides_on_Several_Rat_Tissues_following_Kainic_Acid_Induced_Status_Epilepticus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/5287507 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -