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Deficits in muscle strength and physical performance in sarcopenic children after liver transplantation influences physical activity.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS

Sarcopenia is a muscle disease characterized by reduced skeletal muscle mass (SMM), muscle strength and physical performance. Reduced SMM has been identified in children after liver transplantation (LTx), but no information related to muscle strength/physical performance or lifestyle factors contributing to sarcopenia is available. We hypothesized that sarcopenia, as determined by measures of SMM, muscle strength and physical performance is highly prevalent in post-LTx children and related to poor diet quality and physical inactivity.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study in post-LTx children (n=22) and age-matched healthy controls (n=47) between the ages of 6-18 years examining body composition (Dual Energy X-ray absorptiometery, multiple skinfold), measures of muscle strength (handgrip, sit-to-stand, push-ups), physical performance (6-minute walk test, stair climb test), diet (3-day food intake) and physical activity (accelerometer) was conducted. Low muscle strength/physical performance and SMM (SMM-z scores≤-1.5) were defined by values 2 standard deviation below mean values for age-and-gender matched controls.

RESULTS

Sarcopenia occurred in 36% of LTx children. LTx children had significantly lower scores for muscle strength (sit-to-stand, push-up) and physical performance (stair climb test) than controls (p<0.05). Deficits in physical performance in children with sarcopenia were predominantly revealed by longer stair climbing times (p=0.03), with no differences in other muscle tests. Low SMM, muscle strength and physical performance were associated with lower amount of time spent in fairly and very active physical activity but no associations with diet quality were found.

CONCLUSIONS

Sarcopenia is highly prevalent in children after LTx and is related to lower moderate and vigorous physical activity. Development of effective rehabilitation strategies to treat sarcopenia are needed in post-LTx children.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta.Department of Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta.Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta.Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, University of Alberta.Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta. Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition/Transplant Services, The Stollery Children's Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Alberta.Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta. Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology & Nutrition/Transplant Services, The Stollery Children's Hospital, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, Alberta.Department of Agricultural, Food & Nutritional Sciences, University of Alberta. Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31965696

Citation

Ooi, Poh Hwa, et al. "Deficits in Muscle Strength and Physical Performance in Sarcopenic Children After Liver Transplantation Influences Physical Activity." Liver Transplantation : Official Publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, 2020.
Ooi PH, Mazurak VC, Siminoski K, et al. Deficits in muscle strength and physical performance in sarcopenic children after liver transplantation influences physical activity. Liver Transpl. 2020.
Ooi, P. H., Mazurak, V. C., Siminoski, K., Bhargava, R., Yap, J. Y., Gilmour, S. M., & Mager, D. R. (2020). Deficits in muscle strength and physical performance in sarcopenic children after liver transplantation influences physical activity. Liver Transplantation : Official Publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society, doi:10.1002/lt.25720.
Ooi PH, et al. Deficits in Muscle Strength and Physical Performance in Sarcopenic Children After Liver Transplantation Influences Physical Activity. Liver Transpl. 2020 Jan 22; PubMed PMID: 31965696.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Deficits in muscle strength and physical performance in sarcopenic children after liver transplantation influences physical activity. AU - Ooi,Poh Hwa, AU - Mazurak,Vera C, AU - Siminoski,Kerry, AU - Bhargava,Ravi, AU - Yap,Jason Yk, AU - Gilmour,Susan M, AU - Mager,Diana R, Y1 - 2020/01/22/ PY - 2020/1/23/entrez KW - Body composition KW - diet KW - liver transplantation KW - sarcopenia JF - Liver transplantation : official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society JO - Liver Transpl. N2 - BACKGROUND & AIMS: Sarcopenia is a muscle disease characterized by reduced skeletal muscle mass (SMM), muscle strength and physical performance. Reduced SMM has been identified in children after liver transplantation (LTx), but no information related to muscle strength/physical performance or lifestyle factors contributing to sarcopenia is available. We hypothesized that sarcopenia, as determined by measures of SMM, muscle strength and physical performance is highly prevalent in post-LTx children and related to poor diet quality and physical inactivity. METHODS: A cross-sectional study in post-LTx children (n=22) and age-matched healthy controls (n=47) between the ages of 6-18 years examining body composition (Dual Energy X-ray absorptiometery, multiple skinfold), measures of muscle strength (handgrip, sit-to-stand, push-ups), physical performance (6-minute walk test, stair climb test), diet (3-day food intake) and physical activity (accelerometer) was conducted. Low muscle strength/physical performance and SMM (SMM-z scores≤-1.5) were defined by values 2 standard deviation below mean values for age-and-gender matched controls. RESULTS: Sarcopenia occurred in 36% of LTx children. LTx children had significantly lower scores for muscle strength (sit-to-stand, push-up) and physical performance (stair climb test) than controls (p<0.05). Deficits in physical performance in children with sarcopenia were predominantly revealed by longer stair climbing times (p=0.03), with no differences in other muscle tests. Low SMM, muscle strength and physical performance were associated with lower amount of time spent in fairly and very active physical activity but no associations with diet quality were found. CONCLUSIONS: Sarcopenia is highly prevalent in children after LTx and is related to lower moderate and vigorous physical activity. Development of effective rehabilitation strategies to treat sarcopenia are needed in post-LTx children. SN - 1527-6473 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31965696/Deficits_in_muscle_strength_and_physical_performance_in_sarcopenic_children_after_liver_transplantation_influences_physical_activity L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/lt.25720 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -