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Biopsychosocial correlates of physical activity and sedentary time in adults with severe obesity.
Clin Obes. 2020 Jan 21 [Online ahead of print]CO

Abstract

Adults with severe obesity have poorer health, are less active and spend more time sedentary compared to people with a lower body mass index (BMI). There is a pressing need to understand the factors associated with low physical activity (PA) and excessive sedentary time to develop more effective behaviour change interventions for this population. The purpose of this study was to identify biopsychosocial correlates of PA and sedentary time in adults living with severe obesity. Forty-four adults living with severe obesity (age = 50.5 ± 13.3 years; BMI = 44.3 ± 7.8 kg/m2) completed a survey including questions on sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, psychosocial factors (eg, social physique anxiety [SPA], social support for PA, PA level self-perception), quality of life, daily pain and self-reported moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA). Participants also completed the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) to assess physical fitness and wore an accelerometer to assess objective PA and sedentary time. In stepwise linear multivariate analyses, higher objective MVPA was associated with higher 6MWT distance, being single and lower SPA (R2 = 0.46, P < .001), whereas higher self-reported MVPA was associated with greater PA level self-perceptions (R2 = 0.47, P < .001). Greater objective light intensity PA was associated with greater quality of life and self-efficacy for PA (R2 = 0.26, P = .001). Greater sedentary time was associated with having more comorbidities (R2 = 0.25, P < .001). This study shows that adults living with severe obesity who have more comorbidities, poorer quality of life and/or lower self-efficacy perception for PA are more likely to be sedentary and to practice less light intensity PA. Additionally, those who were in a relationship, had higher SPA and/or had lower physical fitness practiced less MVPA. Future research is needed to determine causal effects.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université du Québec en Outaouais, Gatineau, Québec, Canada. Centre de recherche du Centre Intégré de Santé et Services Sociaux de l'Outaouais, Gatineau, Québec, Canada. Institut du savoir Montfort-Recherche, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Institut du savoir Montfort-Recherche, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Human Kinetics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.Faculty of Medicine, School of Kinesiology and Physical Activity Sciences, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Québec, Canada.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31965721

Citation

Baillot, Aurélie, et al. "Biopsychosocial Correlates of Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Adults With Severe Obesity." Clinical Obesity, 2020, pp. e12355.
Baillot A, Black M, Brunet J, et al. Biopsychosocial correlates of physical activity and sedentary time in adults with severe obesity. Clin Obes. 2020.
Baillot, A., Black, M., Brunet, J., & Romain, A. J. (2020). Biopsychosocial correlates of physical activity and sedentary time in adults with severe obesity. Clinical Obesity, e12355. https://doi.org/10.1111/cob.12355
Baillot A, et al. Biopsychosocial Correlates of Physical Activity and Sedentary Time in Adults With Severe Obesity. Clin Obes. 2020 Jan 21;e12355. PubMed PMID: 31965721.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biopsychosocial correlates of physical activity and sedentary time in adults with severe obesity. AU - Baillot,Aurélie, AU - Black,Melissa, AU - Brunet,Jennifer, AU - Romain,Ahmed J, Y1 - 2020/01/21/ PY - 2019/09/12/received PY - 2019/12/10/revised PY - 2020/01/03/accepted PY - 2020/1/23/entrez KW - barrier KW - factor KW - morbid obesity KW - sedentary behaviour SP - e12355 EP - e12355 JF - Clinical obesity JO - Clin Obes N2 - Adults with severe obesity have poorer health, are less active and spend more time sedentary compared to people with a lower body mass index (BMI). There is a pressing need to understand the factors associated with low physical activity (PA) and excessive sedentary time to develop more effective behaviour change interventions for this population. The purpose of this study was to identify biopsychosocial correlates of PA and sedentary time in adults living with severe obesity. Forty-four adults living with severe obesity (age = 50.5 ± 13.3 years; BMI = 44.3 ± 7.8 kg/m2) completed a survey including questions on sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities, psychosocial factors (eg, social physique anxiety [SPA], social support for PA, PA level self-perception), quality of life, daily pain and self-reported moderate-to-vigorous intensity PA (MVPA). Participants also completed the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) to assess physical fitness and wore an accelerometer to assess objective PA and sedentary time. In stepwise linear multivariate analyses, higher objective MVPA was associated with higher 6MWT distance, being single and lower SPA (R2 = 0.46, P < .001), whereas higher self-reported MVPA was associated with greater PA level self-perceptions (R2 = 0.47, P < .001). Greater objective light intensity PA was associated with greater quality of life and self-efficacy for PA (R2 = 0.26, P = .001). Greater sedentary time was associated with having more comorbidities (R2 = 0.25, P < .001). This study shows that adults living with severe obesity who have more comorbidities, poorer quality of life and/or lower self-efficacy perception for PA are more likely to be sedentary and to practice less light intensity PA. Additionally, those who were in a relationship, had higher SPA and/or had lower physical fitness practiced less MVPA. Future research is needed to determine causal effects. SN - 1758-8111 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31965721/Biopsychosocial_correlates_of_physical_activity_and_sedentary_time_in_adults_with_severe_obesity L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/cob.12355 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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