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Cross-species transmission of the newly identified coronavirus 2019-nCoV.
J Med Virol. 2020 04; 92(4):433-440.JM

Abstract

The current outbreak of viral pneumonia in the city of Wuhan, China, was caused by a novel coronavirus designated 2019-nCoV by the World Health Organization, as determined by sequencing the viral RNA genome. Many initial patients were exposed to wildlife animals at the Huanan seafood wholesale market, where poultry, snake, bats, and other farm animals were also sold. To investigate possible virus reservoir, we have carried out comprehensive sequence analysis and comparison in conjunction with relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) bias among different animal species based on the 2019-nCoV sequence. Results obtained from our analyses suggest that the 2019-nCoV may appear to be a recombinant virus between the bat coronavirus and an origin-unknown coronavirus. The recombination may occurred within the viral spike glycoprotein, which recognizes a cell surface receptor. Additionally, our findings suggest that 2019-nCoV has most similar genetic information with bat coronovirus and most similar codon usage bias with snake. Taken together, our results suggest that homologous recombination may occur and contribute to the 2019-nCoV cross-species transmission.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Microbiology, Peking University Health Science Center School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing, China.Department of Spleen and Stomach Diseases, The First affiliated Hospital of Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning, China.Department of Science and Technology, Ruikang Hospital Affiliated to Guangxi University of Chinese Medicine, Nanning, China.Immunology Innovation Team, School of Medicine, Ningbo University, Ningbo, China.Hubei Engineering Research Center of Viral Vector, Wuhan University of Bioengineering, Wuhan, China.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31967321

Citation

Ji, Wei, et al. "Cross-species Transmission of the Newly Identified Coronavirus 2019-nCoV." Journal of Medical Virology, vol. 92, no. 4, 2020, pp. 433-440.
Ji W, Wang W, Zhao X, et al. Cross-species transmission of the newly identified coronavirus 2019-nCoV. J Med Virol. 2020;92(4):433-440.
Ji, W., Wang, W., Zhao, X., Zai, J., & Li, X. (2020). Cross-species transmission of the newly identified coronavirus 2019-nCoV. Journal of Medical Virology, 92(4), 433-440. https://doi.org/10.1002/jmv.25682
Ji W, et al. Cross-species Transmission of the Newly Identified Coronavirus 2019-nCoV. J Med Virol. 2020;92(4):433-440. PubMed PMID: 31967321.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cross-species transmission of the newly identified coronavirus 2019-nCoV. AU - Ji,Wei, AU - Wang,Wei, AU - Zhao,Xiaofang, AU - Zai,Junjie, AU - Li,Xingguang, PY - 2020/01/17/received PY - 2020/01/21/accepted PY - 2020/1/23/pubmed PY - 2020/3/20/medline PY - 2020/1/23/entrez KW - 2019-nCoV KW - codon usage bias KW - cross-species transmission KW - phylogenetic analysis KW - recombination SP - 433 EP - 440 JF - Journal of medical virology JO - J Med Virol VL - 92 IS - 4 N2 - The current outbreak of viral pneumonia in the city of Wuhan, China, was caused by a novel coronavirus designated 2019-nCoV by the World Health Organization, as determined by sequencing the viral RNA genome. Many initial patients were exposed to wildlife animals at the Huanan seafood wholesale market, where poultry, snake, bats, and other farm animals were also sold. To investigate possible virus reservoir, we have carried out comprehensive sequence analysis and comparison in conjunction with relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) bias among different animal species based on the 2019-nCoV sequence. Results obtained from our analyses suggest that the 2019-nCoV may appear to be a recombinant virus between the bat coronavirus and an origin-unknown coronavirus. The recombination may occurred within the viral spike glycoprotein, which recognizes a cell surface receptor. Additionally, our findings suggest that 2019-nCoV has most similar genetic information with bat coronovirus and most similar codon usage bias with snake. Taken together, our results suggest that homologous recombination may occur and contribute to the 2019-nCoV cross-species transmission. SN - 1096-9071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31967321/Cross_species_transmission_of_the_newly_identified_coronavirus_2019_nCoV_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -