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Bayesian Phylogenetic Analysis of Avipoxviruses from North American Wild Birds Demonstrates New Insights into Host Specificity and Interspecies Transmission.
Avian Dis. 2019 09 01; 63(3):427-432.AD

Abstract

Avian pox is commonly diagnosed in a variety of North American wild and domestic birds, yet little is known about the evolutionary relationships among the causative poxviruses. This study aimed to determine the phylogenetic relationships among isolates identified in different avian host species to better characterize the host range of specific viral strains and compare the genetic variability within and between viral clades. Skin lesions grossly and microscopically consistent with poxvirus infection from 82 birds collected in Canada, the United States, and the U.S. Virgin Islands were included in this study. A total of 12 avian species were represented; the most common species sampled were wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo), mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), and American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). Poxvirus samples from these birds were genotyped using PCR that targeted the 4b core protein gene followed by amplicon sequencing. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of these viruses, in conjunction with publicly available sequences, representing avipoxvirus strains from six continents revealed statistically significant monophyletic clades based on genetic distances of sequences within and between observed clades. Genetic variation within the fowlpox clade was low compared to the canarypox clade. Host and geographic origins of viral isolates revealed overall clustering of viral strains within avian species, with a few exceptions. No genetic differences were observed between viruses from Canada and the United States within individual species. These results are novel in their characterization and comparison of the phylogenetic relationships of poxvirus isolates in wild bird species from North America. Further, we provide new data on the level of host specificity and specific strains circulating in North America.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, NIG 2W1, amacdo21@uoguelph.ca. Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, NIG 2W1, amacdo21@uoguelph.ca. These authors contributed equally to this work.Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, NIG 2W1. These authors contributed equally to this work.Department of Pathobiology, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, NIG 2W1.Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.Pennsylvania Game Commission, Animal Diagnostic Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802.Department of Comparative, Diagnostic, and Population Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610.Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31967425

Citation

MacDonald, Amanda M., et al. "Bayesian Phylogenetic Analysis of Avipoxviruses From North American Wild Birds Demonstrates New Insights Into Host Specificity and Interspecies Transmission." Avian Diseases, vol. 63, no. 3, 2019, pp. 427-432.
MacDonald AM, Gibson DJ, Barta JR, et al. Bayesian Phylogenetic Analysis of Avipoxviruses from North American Wild Birds Demonstrates New Insights into Host Specificity and Interspecies Transmission. Avian Dis. 2019;63(3):427-432.
MacDonald, A. M., Gibson, D. J., Barta, J. R., Poulson, R., Brown, J. D., Allison, A. B., & Nemeth, N. M. (2019). Bayesian Phylogenetic Analysis of Avipoxviruses from North American Wild Birds Demonstrates New Insights into Host Specificity and Interspecies Transmission. Avian Diseases, 63(3), 427-432. https://doi.org/10.1637/12023-010619-Reg.1
MacDonald AM, et al. Bayesian Phylogenetic Analysis of Avipoxviruses From North American Wild Birds Demonstrates New Insights Into Host Specificity and Interspecies Transmission. Avian Dis. 2019 09 1;63(3):427-432. PubMed PMID: 31967425.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bayesian Phylogenetic Analysis of Avipoxviruses from North American Wild Birds Demonstrates New Insights into Host Specificity and Interspecies Transmission. AU - MacDonald,Amanda M, AU - Gibson,Daniel J, AU - Barta,John R, AU - Poulson,Rebecca, AU - Brown,Justin D, AU - Allison,Andrew B, AU - Nemeth,Nicole M, PY - 2019/01/07/received PY - 2019/04/11/accepted PY - 2020/1/23/entrez PY - 2020/1/23/pubmed PY - 2020/5/15/medline SP - 427 EP - 432 JF - Avian diseases JO - Avian Dis. VL - 63 IS - 3 N2 - Avian pox is commonly diagnosed in a variety of North American wild and domestic birds, yet little is known about the evolutionary relationships among the causative poxviruses. This study aimed to determine the phylogenetic relationships among isolates identified in different avian host species to better characterize the host range of specific viral strains and compare the genetic variability within and between viral clades. Skin lesions grossly and microscopically consistent with poxvirus infection from 82 birds collected in Canada, the United States, and the U.S. Virgin Islands were included in this study. A total of 12 avian species were represented; the most common species sampled were wild turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo), mourning doves (Zenaida macroura), and American crows (Corvus brachyrhynchos). Poxvirus samples from these birds were genotyped using PCR that targeted the 4b core protein gene followed by amplicon sequencing. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses of these viruses, in conjunction with publicly available sequences, representing avipoxvirus strains from six continents revealed statistically significant monophyletic clades based on genetic distances of sequences within and between observed clades. Genetic variation within the fowlpox clade was low compared to the canarypox clade. Host and geographic origins of viral isolates revealed overall clustering of viral strains within avian species, with a few exceptions. No genetic differences were observed between viruses from Canada and the United States within individual species. These results are novel in their characterization and comparison of the phylogenetic relationships of poxvirus isolates in wild bird species from North America. Further, we provide new data on the level of host specificity and specific strains circulating in North America. SN - 1938-4351 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31967425/Bayesian_Phylogenetic_Analysis_of_Avipoxviruses_from_North_American_Wild_Birds_Demonstrates_New_Insights_into_Host_Specificity_and_Interspecies_Transmission L2 - https://doi.org/10.1637/12023-010619-Reg.1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -