Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Prevalence and Risk Factors of Incidental Findings in Brain MRIs of Healthy Neonates-The FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study.
Front Neurol. 2019; 10:1347.FN

Abstract

Background:

Birth is a traumatic event with molding forces directed to the fetal skull, which may result in intracranial hemorrhages. However, the knowledge on prevalence and risk factors of incidental brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in infants is still inconclusive.

Methods:

The prevalence and nature of incidental MRI findings were assessed in a birth cohort of 175 asymptomatic infants. The role of delivery method as well as other potential risk factors for intracranial hemorrhages were evaluated. The infants underwent 3T MRI at the age of 2-5 weeks, and the neurological status of the infants with an incidental finding was evaluated by a pediatric neurologist. Information on the delivery method, duration of delivery, parity, used anesthesia, oxytocin induction, and Apgar score was gathered to evaluate their association with the prevalence of hemorrhages.

Results:

Incidental intracranial hemorrhages were detected in 12 infants (6.9%), all following spontaneous or assisted vaginal delivery. Vacuum-assistance was found to be a risk factor for subdural hemorrhages with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.7 (95% CI [1.18; 18.9], p = 0.032). All infants were evaluated to develop normally by their clinical status.

Conclusions:

Incidental intracranial hemorrhages are relatively common among infants born by vaginal delivery. They are often of little clinical significance within the first years of life and have unlikely consequences for later neurodevelopment either. Despite their benign character, investigators should be prepared to share this information with parents competently as the findings can cause parental anxiety, and especially as the popularity of MRI as a research tool is increasing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Psychology, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Centre for Population Health Research, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Centre for Population Health Research, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Child Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Future Technologies, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Center of Computational Imaging and Personalized Diagnostics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, United States.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Radiology, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.Department of Medical Physics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Pediatric Neurology, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study, Turku Brain and Mind Center, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Turku, Turku, Finland. Department of Psychiatry, Turku University Hospital, University of Turku, Turku, Finland.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31969859

Citation

Kumpulainen, Venla, et al. "Prevalence and Risk Factors of Incidental Findings in Brain MRIs of Healthy Neonates-The FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study." Frontiers in Neurology, vol. 10, 2019, p. 1347.
Kumpulainen V, Lehtola SJ, Tuulari JJ, et al. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Incidental Findings in Brain MRIs of Healthy Neonates-The FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. Front Neurol. 2019;10:1347.
Kumpulainen, V., Lehtola, S. J., Tuulari, J. J., Silver, E., Copeland, A., Korja, R., Karlsson, H., Karlsson, L., Merisaari, H., Parkkola, R., Saunavaara, J., Lähdesmäki, T., & Scheinin, N. M. (2019). Prevalence and Risk Factors of Incidental Findings in Brain MRIs of Healthy Neonates-The FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. Frontiers in Neurology, 10, 1347. https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.01347
Kumpulainen V, et al. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Incidental Findings in Brain MRIs of Healthy Neonates-The FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. Front Neurol. 2019;10:1347. PubMed PMID: 31969859.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and Risk Factors of Incidental Findings in Brain MRIs of Healthy Neonates-The FinnBrain Birth Cohort Study. AU - Kumpulainen,Venla, AU - Lehtola,Satu J, AU - Tuulari,Jetro J, AU - Silver,Eero, AU - Copeland,Anni, AU - Korja,Riikka, AU - Karlsson,Hasse, AU - Karlsson,Linnea, AU - Merisaari,Harri, AU - Parkkola,Riitta, AU - Saunavaara,Jani, AU - Lähdesmäki,Tuire, AU - Scheinin,Noora M, Y1 - 2020/01/08/ PY - 2019/10/14/received PY - 2019/12/06/accepted PY - 2020/1/24/entrez PY - 2020/1/24/pubmed PY - 2020/1/24/medline KW - MRI KW - delivery method KW - incidental finding KW - infant KW - subdural hemorrhage SP - 1347 EP - 1347 JF - Frontiers in neurology JO - Front Neurol VL - 10 N2 - Background: Birth is a traumatic event with molding forces directed to the fetal skull, which may result in intracranial hemorrhages. However, the knowledge on prevalence and risk factors of incidental brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in infants is still inconclusive. Methods: The prevalence and nature of incidental MRI findings were assessed in a birth cohort of 175 asymptomatic infants. The role of delivery method as well as other potential risk factors for intracranial hemorrhages were evaluated. The infants underwent 3T MRI at the age of 2-5 weeks, and the neurological status of the infants with an incidental finding was evaluated by a pediatric neurologist. Information on the delivery method, duration of delivery, parity, used anesthesia, oxytocin induction, and Apgar score was gathered to evaluate their association with the prevalence of hemorrhages. Results: Incidental intracranial hemorrhages were detected in 12 infants (6.9%), all following spontaneous or assisted vaginal delivery. Vacuum-assistance was found to be a risk factor for subdural hemorrhages with an odds ratio (OR) of 4.7 (95% CI [1.18; 18.9], p = 0.032). All infants were evaluated to develop normally by their clinical status. Conclusions: Incidental intracranial hemorrhages are relatively common among infants born by vaginal delivery. They are often of little clinical significance within the first years of life and have unlikely consequences for later neurodevelopment either. Despite their benign character, investigators should be prepared to share this information with parents competently as the findings can cause parental anxiety, and especially as the popularity of MRI as a research tool is increasing. SN - 1664-2295 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31969859/Prevalence_and_Risk_Factors_of_Incidental_Findings_in_Brain_MRIs_of_Healthy_Neonates-The_FinnBrain_Birth_Cohort_Study L2 - https://doi.org/10.3389/fneur.2019.01347 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.