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Shoulder Arthroplasty Utilization Based on Race - Are Black Patients Underrepresented?
Arch Bone Jt Surg 2019; 7(6):484-492AB

Abstract

Background

This study aimed to analyze national and institutional trends in shoulder arthroplasty utilization based on patient race.

Methods

The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was employed to determine racial trends in shoulder arthroplasty utilization at a national level. An institutional database was then utilized to retrospectively identify all patients, undergoing shoulder arthroplasty within 2011-2013. Descriptive statistics were used to compare self-identified black and non-black subpopulations.

Results

The NIS identified 256,832 primary shoulder arthroplasties within 2005-2011. Black patients constituted 3.92% (n=10,074) of cases. Utilization increased from 3.36% in 2005 to 4.49% in 2011. Locally, a total number of 1,174 primary shoulder arthroplasties were performed, the recipients of 5.96% (n=70) of which were black. Females accounted for 48/70 (68.6%) of black patients. Black patients had a higher body mass index (33.6 vs. 30.1, P<0.0001) and were younger (62.6 vs. 67.2 years, P<0.0001), compared to the non-black patients. Regarding insurance type, 1,074 patients (i.e., 65 black and 1,009 non-black) had comprehensive insurance data. Chi-square analysis of five major insurance categories, including private, Medicare, Medicaid, workers' compensation, and personal injury, indicated no difference in insurance patterns (χ2=3.658, P=0.454).

Conclusion

The findings revealed significant racial disparity in shoulder arthroplasty utilization both at national and institutional levels. This disparity exists despite the similar rates of osteoarthritis in both white and black patients. Black patients in our institution had similar clinical, demographic, and socioeconomic characteristics as in our non-black patients. The obtained results highlighted the need for the expansion of black patients' access to care services related to major joint reconstruction.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Research performed at the Rothman Institute of Orthopedics, Methodist Hospital-Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Research performed at the Rothman Institute of Orthopedics, Methodist Hospital-Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Research performed at the Rothman Institute of Orthopedics, Methodist Hospital-Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Research performed at the Rothman Institute of Orthopedics, Methodist Hospital-Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31970252

Citation

Tompson, Jeffrey D., et al. "Shoulder Arthroplasty Utilization Based On Race - Are Black Patients Underrepresented?" The Archives of Bone and Joint Surgery, vol. 7, no. 6, 2019, pp. 484-492.
Tompson JD, Syed UA, Padegimas EM, et al. Shoulder Arthroplasty Utilization Based on Race - Are Black Patients Underrepresented? Arch Bone Jt Surg. 2019;7(6):484-492.
Tompson, J. D., Syed, U. A., Padegimas, E. M., & Abboud, J. A. (2019). Shoulder Arthroplasty Utilization Based on Race - Are Black Patients Underrepresented? The Archives of Bone and Joint Surgery, 7(6), pp. 484-492.
Tompson JD, et al. Shoulder Arthroplasty Utilization Based On Race - Are Black Patients Underrepresented. Arch Bone Jt Surg. 2019;7(6):484-492. PubMed PMID: 31970252.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Shoulder Arthroplasty Utilization Based on Race - Are Black Patients Underrepresented? AU - Tompson,Jeffrey D, AU - Syed,Usman A, AU - Padegimas,Eric M, AU - Abboud,Joseph A, PY - 2020/1/24/entrez PY - 2020/1/24/pubmed PY - 2020/1/24/medline KW - Nationwide inpatient sample KW - Public policy KW - Race utilization KW - Total shoulder arthroplasty SP - 484 EP - 492 JF - The archives of bone and joint surgery JO - Arch Bone Jt Surg VL - 7 IS - 6 N2 - Background: This study aimed to analyze national and institutional trends in shoulder arthroplasty utilization based on patient race. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was employed to determine racial trends in shoulder arthroplasty utilization at a national level. An institutional database was then utilized to retrospectively identify all patients, undergoing shoulder arthroplasty within 2011-2013. Descriptive statistics were used to compare self-identified black and non-black subpopulations. Results: The NIS identified 256,832 primary shoulder arthroplasties within 2005-2011. Black patients constituted 3.92% (n=10,074) of cases. Utilization increased from 3.36% in 2005 to 4.49% in 2011. Locally, a total number of 1,174 primary shoulder arthroplasties were performed, the recipients of 5.96% (n=70) of which were black. Females accounted for 48/70 (68.6%) of black patients. Black patients had a higher body mass index (33.6 vs. 30.1, P<0.0001) and were younger (62.6 vs. 67.2 years, P<0.0001), compared to the non-black patients. Regarding insurance type, 1,074 patients (i.e., 65 black and 1,009 non-black) had comprehensive insurance data. Chi-square analysis of five major insurance categories, including private, Medicare, Medicaid, workers' compensation, and personal injury, indicated no difference in insurance patterns (χ2=3.658, P=0.454). Conclusion: The findings revealed significant racial disparity in shoulder arthroplasty utilization both at national and institutional levels. This disparity exists despite the similar rates of osteoarthritis in both white and black patients. Black patients in our institution had similar clinical, demographic, and socioeconomic characteristics as in our non-black patients. The obtained results highlighted the need for the expansion of black patients' access to care services related to major joint reconstruction. SN - 2345-4644 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31970252/Shoulder_Arthroplasty_Utilization_Based_on_Race_-_Are_Black_Patients_Underrepresented L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/31970252/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -