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How Do Sports Medicine and Foot and Ankle Specialists Treat Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures?
Foot Ankle Spec. 2020 Jan 23 [Online ahead of print]FA

Abstract

Background.

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment considerations and surgical techniques utilized by fellowship-trained orthopaedic sports medicine and foot and ankle specialists in the management of Achilles tendon ruptures. Methods. A blinded electronic survey was distributed to 2062 fellowship-trained sports medicine and 1319 fellowship-trained foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeons. The total number of acute Achilles tendon ruptures managed per year, patient-specific factors associated with surgical decision making and surgical techniques were evaluated.

Results.

Of the 3381 surveys distributed, 524 responses were included for analysis. Only 9% of respondents manage more than 20 acute Achilles tendon ruptures per year with the majority (75%) managing less than 10 per year. Operative management is the treatment of choice for 76% of total respondents with only 8% managing acute ruptures nonoperatively. Activity level and patient age were the single most important factors for 60.8% and 29.3% of surgeons, respectively, with regard to operative versus nonoperative decision making. Socioeconomic status and workers compensation were the least important patient factors.

Conclusion.

Surgical repair in the young and active patient is the preferred treatment for the majority of fellowship-trained subspecialists who most commonly encounter this pathology. Levels of Evidence: Therapeutic, Level V: Consensus of Expert Analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston University Medical School and Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (RLP, XL). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (DPT, WNL, JTV). Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (APG). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CCD).Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston University Medical School and Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (RLP, XL). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (DPT, WNL, JTV). Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (APG). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CCD).Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston University Medical School and Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (RLP, XL). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (DPT, WNL, JTV). Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (APG). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CCD).Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston University Medical School and Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (RLP, XL). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (DPT, WNL, JTV). Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (APG). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CCD).Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston University Medical School and Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (RLP, XL). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (DPT, WNL, JTV). Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (APG). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CCD).Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston University Medical School and Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (RLP, XL). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (DPT, WNL, JTV). Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (APG). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CCD).Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston University Medical School and Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (RLP, XL). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (DPT, WNL, JTV). Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York (APG). Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (CCD).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31971006

Citation

Parisien, Robert L., et al. "How Do Sports Medicine and Foot and Ankle Specialists Treat Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures?" Foot & Ankle Specialist, 2020, p. 1938640019901055.
Parisien RL, Trofa DP, Gualtieri AP, et al. How Do Sports Medicine and Foot and Ankle Specialists Treat Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures? Foot Ankle Spec. 2020.
Parisien, R. L., Trofa, D. P., Gualtieri, A. P., Dodson, C. C., Li, X., Levine, W. N., & Vosseller, J. T. (2020). How Do Sports Medicine and Foot and Ankle Specialists Treat Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures? Foot & Ankle Specialist, 1938640019901055. https://doi.org/10.1177/1938640019901055
Parisien RL, et al. How Do Sports Medicine and Foot and Ankle Specialists Treat Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures. Foot Ankle Spec. 2020 Jan 23;1938640019901055. PubMed PMID: 31971006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - How Do Sports Medicine and Foot and Ankle Specialists Treat Acute Achilles Tendon Ruptures? AU - Parisien,Robert L, AU - Trofa,David P, AU - Gualtieri,Anthony P, AU - Dodson,Christopher C, AU - Li,Xinning, AU - Levine,William N, AU - Vosseller,J Turner, Y1 - 2020/01/23/ PY - 2020/1/24/entrez KW - Achilles KW - Achilles tendon rupture KW - foot and ankle injuries KW - nonoperative Achilles KW - operative Achilles SP - 1938640019901055 EP - 1938640019901055 JF - Foot & ankle specialist JO - Foot Ankle Spec N2 - Background. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the treatment considerations and surgical techniques utilized by fellowship-trained orthopaedic sports medicine and foot and ankle specialists in the management of Achilles tendon ruptures. Methods. A blinded electronic survey was distributed to 2062 fellowship-trained sports medicine and 1319 fellowship-trained foot and ankle orthopaedic surgeons. The total number of acute Achilles tendon ruptures managed per year, patient-specific factors associated with surgical decision making and surgical techniques were evaluated. Results. Of the 3381 surveys distributed, 524 responses were included for analysis. Only 9% of respondents manage more than 20 acute Achilles tendon ruptures per year with the majority (75%) managing less than 10 per year. Operative management is the treatment of choice for 76% of total respondents with only 8% managing acute ruptures nonoperatively. Activity level and patient age were the single most important factors for 60.8% and 29.3% of surgeons, respectively, with regard to operative versus nonoperative decision making. Socioeconomic status and workers compensation were the least important patient factors. Conclusion. Surgical repair in the young and active patient is the preferred treatment for the majority of fellowship-trained subspecialists who most commonly encounter this pathology. Levels of Evidence: Therapeutic, Level V: Consensus of Expert Analysis. SN - 1938-7636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31971006/How_Do_Sports_Medicine_and_Foot_and_Ankle_Specialists_Treat_Acute_Achilles_Tendon_Ruptures L2 - http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1938640019901055?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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