Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer may differ by Anatomical Subsite and Sex.

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine if the increased risk of colorectal cancer due to cigarette smoking differed by anatomical subsite and sex. We analyzed data from 188,052 participants (45% men, aged 45-75 years), who were enrolled in the Multiethnic Cohort Study in 1993-1996. During a mean follow-up of 16.7 years, we identified 4,879 incident cases of invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma. In multivariate Cox regression models, compared with never smokers of the same sex, male ever smokers had a 39% [hazard ratio (HR) =1.39; 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.16,1.67] higher risk of left, but not of right (HR=1.03; 95% CI: 0.89,1.18) colon cancer, while female ever smokers, had a 20% (HR=1.20; 95% CI: 1.06,1.36) higher risk of right, but not of left (HR=0.96; 95% CI: 0.80,1.15) colon cancer. Compared with male smokers, female smokers had a greater increase in risk of rectal cancer with number of pack-years (Pheterogeneity = 0.03). Our results suggest that male smokers are at increased risk of left colon cancer and female smokers at increased risk of right colon cancer. Our study also suggests that females who smoke may have a higher risk of rectal cancer due to smoking than their male counterparts.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.The Population Sciences in the Pacific Program, University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.The Population Sciences in the Pacific Program, University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.The Population Sciences in the Pacific Program, University of Hawai'i Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31971226

Citation

Gram, Inger T., et al. "Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer May Differ By Anatomical Subsite and Sex." American Journal of Epidemiology, 2020.
Gram IT, Park SY, Wilkens LR, et al. Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer may differ by Anatomical Subsite and Sex. Am J Epidemiol. 2020.
Gram, I. T., Park, S. Y., Wilkens, L. R., Haiman, C. A., & Le Marchand, L. (2020). Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer may differ by Anatomical Subsite and Sex. American Journal of Epidemiology, doi:10.1093/aje/kwaa005.
Gram IT, et al. Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer May Differ By Anatomical Subsite and Sex. Am J Epidemiol. 2020 Jan 23; PubMed PMID: 31971226.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer may differ by Anatomical Subsite and Sex. AU - Gram,Inger T, AU - Park,Song-Yi, AU - Wilkens,Lynne R, AU - Haiman,Christopher A, AU - Le Marchand,Loïc, Y1 - 2020/01/23/ PY - 2019/05/15/received PY - 2020/01/07/revised PY - 2020/01/08/accepted PY - 2020/1/24/entrez KW - Cohort KW - colorectal cancer KW - multiethnic population KW - sex KW - smoking JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. N2 - The purpose of this study was to examine if the increased risk of colorectal cancer due to cigarette smoking differed by anatomical subsite and sex. We analyzed data from 188,052 participants (45% men, aged 45-75 years), who were enrolled in the Multiethnic Cohort Study in 1993-1996. During a mean follow-up of 16.7 years, we identified 4,879 incident cases of invasive colorectal adenocarcinoma. In multivariate Cox regression models, compared with never smokers of the same sex, male ever smokers had a 39% [hazard ratio (HR) =1.39; 95% Confidence interval (CI): 1.16,1.67] higher risk of left, but not of right (HR=1.03; 95% CI: 0.89,1.18) colon cancer, while female ever smokers, had a 20% (HR=1.20; 95% CI: 1.06,1.36) higher risk of right, but not of left (HR=0.96; 95% CI: 0.80,1.15) colon cancer. Compared with male smokers, female smokers had a greater increase in risk of rectal cancer with number of pack-years (Pheterogeneity = 0.03). Our results suggest that male smokers are at increased risk of left colon cancer and female smokers at increased risk of right colon cancer. Our study also suggests that females who smoke may have a higher risk of rectal cancer due to smoking than their male counterparts. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31971226/Smoking_and_Risk_of_Colorectal_Cancer_may_differ_by_Anatomical_Subsite_and_Sex L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwaa005 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -