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Heatwaves cause fluctuations in wMel Wolbachia densities and frequencies in Aedes aegypti.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2020; 14(1):e0007958PN

Abstract

Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with the wMel strain of Wolbachia are being released into natural mosquito populations in the tropics as a way of reducing dengue transmission. High temperatures adversely affect wMel, reducing Wolbachia density and cytoplasmic incompatibility in some larval habitats that experience large temperature fluctuations. We monitored the impact of a 43.6°C heatwave on the wMel infection in a natural population in Cairns, Australia, where wMel was first released in 2011 and has persisted at a high frequency. Wolbachia infection frequencies in the month following the heatwave were reduced to 83% in larvae sampled directly from field habitats and 88% in eggs collected from ovitraps, but recovered to be near 100% four months later. Effects of the heatwave on wMel appeared to be stage-specific and delayed, with reduced frequencies and densities in field-collected larvae and adults reared from ovitraps but higher frequencies in field-collected adults. Laboratory experiments showed that the effects of heatwaves on cytoplasmic incompatibility and density are life stage-specific, with first instar larvae being the most vulnerable to temperature effects. Our results indicate that heatwaves in wMel-infected populations will have only temporary effects on Wolbachia frequencies and density once the infection has established in the population. Our results are relevant to ongoing releases of wMel-infected Ae. aegypti in several tropical countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pest and Environmental Adaptation Research Group, Bio21 Institute and the School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.Pest and Environmental Adaptation Research Group, Bio21 Institute and the School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.Pest and Environmental Adaptation Research Group, Bio21 Institute and the School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Smithfield, Queensland, Australia. Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Smithfield, Queensland, Australia.College of Public Health, Medical and Veterinary Sciences, James Cook University, Smithfield, Queensland, Australia. Australian Institute of Tropical Health and Medicine, James Cook University, Smithfield, Queensland, Australia.Pest and Environmental Adaptation Research Group, Bio21 Institute and the School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.Pest and Environmental Adaptation Research Group, Bio21 Institute and the School of BioSciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31971938

Citation

Ross, Perran A., et al. "Heatwaves Cause Fluctuations in wMel Wolbachia Densities and Frequencies in Aedes Aegypti." PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, vol. 14, no. 1, 2020, pp. e0007958.
Ross PA, Axford JK, Yang Q, et al. Heatwaves cause fluctuations in wMel Wolbachia densities and frequencies in Aedes aegypti. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2020;14(1):e0007958.
Ross, P. A., Axford, J. K., Yang, Q., Staunton, K. M., Ritchie, S. A., Richardson, K. M., & Hoffmann, A. A. (2020). Heatwaves cause fluctuations in wMel Wolbachia densities and frequencies in Aedes aegypti. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 14(1), pp. e0007958. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0007958.
Ross PA, et al. Heatwaves Cause Fluctuations in wMel Wolbachia Densities and Frequencies in Aedes Aegypti. PLoS Negl Trop Dis. 2020;14(1):e0007958. PubMed PMID: 31971938.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heatwaves cause fluctuations in wMel Wolbachia densities and frequencies in Aedes aegypti. AU - Ross,Perran A, AU - Axford,Jason K, AU - Yang,Qiong, AU - Staunton,Kyran M, AU - Ritchie,Scott A, AU - Richardson,Kelly M, AU - Hoffmann,Ary A, Y1 - 2020/01/23/ PY - 2019/09/19/received PY - 2019/11/27/accepted PY - 2020/1/24/entrez PY - 2020/1/24/pubmed PY - 2020/1/24/medline SP - e0007958 EP - e0007958 JF - PLoS neglected tropical diseases JO - PLoS Negl Trop Dis VL - 14 IS - 1 N2 - Aedes aegypti mosquitoes infected with the wMel strain of Wolbachia are being released into natural mosquito populations in the tropics as a way of reducing dengue transmission. High temperatures adversely affect wMel, reducing Wolbachia density and cytoplasmic incompatibility in some larval habitats that experience large temperature fluctuations. We monitored the impact of a 43.6°C heatwave on the wMel infection in a natural population in Cairns, Australia, where wMel was first released in 2011 and has persisted at a high frequency. Wolbachia infection frequencies in the month following the heatwave were reduced to 83% in larvae sampled directly from field habitats and 88% in eggs collected from ovitraps, but recovered to be near 100% four months later. Effects of the heatwave on wMel appeared to be stage-specific and delayed, with reduced frequencies and densities in field-collected larvae and adults reared from ovitraps but higher frequencies in field-collected adults. Laboratory experiments showed that the effects of heatwaves on cytoplasmic incompatibility and density are life stage-specific, with first instar larvae being the most vulnerable to temperature effects. Our results indicate that heatwaves in wMel-infected populations will have only temporary effects on Wolbachia frequencies and density once the infection has established in the population. Our results are relevant to ongoing releases of wMel-infected Ae. aegypti in several tropical countries. SN - 1935-2735 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31971938/Heatwaves_cause_fluctuations_in_wMel_Wolbachia_densities_and_frequencies_in_Aedes_aegypti L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0007958 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -