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The Incidence of Dental Fracturing in Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden.
J ECT. 2020 Jan 15 [Online ahead of print]JE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

One adverse effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is dental fracture; thus, a bite guard and muscle relaxants are used to prevent it. Earlier research reported varying rates of dental fracture, but there is no large-scale study on the incidence of dental fracture during ECT. This study aimed to examine the incidence of dental fracture during ECT and to investigate whether the incidence differs between different sexes, age groups, diagnosis groups, electrode placements, or number of treatment sessions.

METHODS

This register-based study used data from the Swedish national quality register for ECT. All hospitals offering ECT report to this register, and the coverage ratio is about 90%. All registered patients who started an ECT series between January 2012 and January 2019 were included in this study, with the data representing 16,681 individuals, 38,862 series, and 254,906 sessions.

RESULTS

Forty-six dental fractures were identified, giving an incidence of dental fracture of 0.2% per series, 0.02% per session, and 0.3% per individual. We did not find any significant associations between dental fracture rates and male or female populations, age, or different diagnosis groups, nor was there any significant difference between dental fracture rates and electrode placement. The mean number of treatments was significantly higher in the dental fracture group than in patients without dental fracture.

CONCLUSIONS

There is a minimal risk of dental fracture during ECT. Our findings, together with those of other studies, provide further motivation for the use of a bite guard and muscle relaxant.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the University Health Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro.Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen. Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Gothenburg.Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Center for Psychiatry Research, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm County Council, Stockholm, Sweden.Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linköping University. Department of Psychiatry, Region Östergötland, Linköping, Sweden.From the University Health Care Research Centre, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31972668

Citation

Göterfelt, Linda, et al. "The Incidence of Dental Fracturing in Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden." The Journal of ECT, 2020.
Göterfelt L, Ekman CJ, Hammar Å, et al. The Incidence of Dental Fracturing in Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden. J ECT. 2020.
Göterfelt, L., Ekman, C. J., Hammar, Å., Landén, M., Lundberg, J., Nordanskog, P., & Nordenskjöld, A. (2020). The Incidence of Dental Fracturing in Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden. The Journal of ECT. https://doi.org/10.1097/YCT.0000000000000652
Göterfelt L, et al. The Incidence of Dental Fracturing in Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden. J ECT. 2020 Jan 15; PubMed PMID: 31972668.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The Incidence of Dental Fracturing in Electroconvulsive Therapy in Sweden. AU - Göterfelt,Linda, AU - Ekman,Carl Johan, AU - Hammar,Åsa, AU - Landén,Mikael, AU - Lundberg,Johan, AU - Nordanskog,Pia, AU - Nordenskjöld,Axel, Y1 - 2020/01/15/ PY - 2020/1/24/entrez PY - 2020/1/24/pubmed PY - 2020/1/24/medline JF - The journal of ECT JO - J ECT N2 - OBJECTIVES: One adverse effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is dental fracture; thus, a bite guard and muscle relaxants are used to prevent it. Earlier research reported varying rates of dental fracture, but there is no large-scale study on the incidence of dental fracture during ECT. This study aimed to examine the incidence of dental fracture during ECT and to investigate whether the incidence differs between different sexes, age groups, diagnosis groups, electrode placements, or number of treatment sessions. METHODS: This register-based study used data from the Swedish national quality register for ECT. All hospitals offering ECT report to this register, and the coverage ratio is about 90%. All registered patients who started an ECT series between January 2012 and January 2019 were included in this study, with the data representing 16,681 individuals, 38,862 series, and 254,906 sessions. RESULTS: Forty-six dental fractures were identified, giving an incidence of dental fracture of 0.2% per series, 0.02% per session, and 0.3% per individual. We did not find any significant associations between dental fracture rates and male or female populations, age, or different diagnosis groups, nor was there any significant difference between dental fracture rates and electrode placement. The mean number of treatments was significantly higher in the dental fracture group than in patients without dental fracture. CONCLUSIONS: There is a minimal risk of dental fracture during ECT. Our findings, together with those of other studies, provide further motivation for the use of a bite guard and muscle relaxant. SN - 1533-4112 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31972668/The_Incidence_of_Dental_Fracturing_in_Electroconvulsive_Therapy_in_Sweden L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/YCT.0000000000000652 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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