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Self-efficacy and Satisfaction With Teaching in Online Courses.
Nurse Educ 2020NE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Growth of online education has increased the demand for satisfied educators with perceived self-efficacy in online teaching. Teaching self-efficacy is an indicator of the belief that one can make a difference in student learning outcomes.

PURPOSE

The aim of this study was to examine the level of teaching self-efficacy and satisfaction of online nursing faculty.

METHODS

This study used a descriptive cross-sectional survey design. Faculty satisfaction was measured by the Online Instructor Satisfaction Measure, and self-efficacy for online teaching was measured by the Michigan Nurse Educator's Sense of Efficacy for Online Teaching instrument.

RESULTS

The sample included 100 faculty in multiple schools of nursing who taught at least 1 online course in RN to BSN or graduate nursing programs. Overall, participants had relatively high levels of online teaching self-efficacy and satisfaction.

CONCLUSIONS

Teacher self-efficacy can be facilitated through faculty development and increased experience teaching online.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Interim Assistant Dean of the MSN & DNP Programs, Academic Program Coordinator of the Graduate Leadership Programs, and Assistant Professor (Dr Hampton); Co-coordinator of the RN to BSN Program and Instructor (Dr Culp-Roche); Assistant Clinical Professor (Dr Hensley); and Director of Online Innovation and Co-Coordinator of the RN to BSN Program and Assistant Clinical Professor (Dr Wilson), University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington; Assistant Professor (Dr Otts), University of South Alabama, Mobile; Lecturer and Statistician (Dr Thaxton-Wiggins), University of Kentucky, Lexington; Professor and Associate Dean for Research, Evaluation, and Development (Dr Fruh), University of South Alabama, Mobile; and Professor and Linda C. Gill Endowed Chair, Assistant Dean of the PhD Program and Scholarly Affairs, and Co-director of the Rich Heart Program (Dr Moser), University of Kentucky College of Nursing, Lexington.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31972846

Citation

Hampton, Debra, et al. "Self-efficacy and Satisfaction With Teaching in Online Courses." Nurse Educator, 2020.
Hampton D, Culp-Roche A, Hensley A, et al. Self-efficacy and Satisfaction With Teaching in Online Courses. Nurse Educ. 2020.
Hampton, D., Culp-Roche, A., Hensley, A., Wilson, J., Otts, J. A., Thaxton-Wiggins, A., ... Moser, D. K. (2020). Self-efficacy and Satisfaction With Teaching in Online Courses. Nurse Educator, doi:10.1097/NNE.0000000000000805.
Hampton D, et al. Self-efficacy and Satisfaction With Teaching in Online Courses. Nurse Educ. 2020 Jan 14; PubMed PMID: 31972846.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-efficacy and Satisfaction With Teaching in Online Courses. AU - Hampton,Debra, AU - Culp-Roche,Amanda, AU - Hensley,Angie, AU - Wilson,Jessica, AU - Otts,Jo Ann, AU - Thaxton-Wiggins,Amanda, AU - Fruh,Sharon, AU - Moser,Debra K, Y1 - 2020/01/14/ PY - 2020/1/24/entrez PY - 2020/1/24/pubmed PY - 2020/1/24/medline JF - Nurse educator JO - Nurse Educ N2 - BACKGROUND: Growth of online education has increased the demand for satisfied educators with perceived self-efficacy in online teaching. Teaching self-efficacy is an indicator of the belief that one can make a difference in student learning outcomes. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to examine the level of teaching self-efficacy and satisfaction of online nursing faculty. METHODS: This study used a descriptive cross-sectional survey design. Faculty satisfaction was measured by the Online Instructor Satisfaction Measure, and self-efficacy for online teaching was measured by the Michigan Nurse Educator's Sense of Efficacy for Online Teaching instrument. RESULTS: The sample included 100 faculty in multiple schools of nursing who taught at least 1 online course in RN to BSN or graduate nursing programs. Overall, participants had relatively high levels of online teaching self-efficacy and satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: Teacher self-efficacy can be facilitated through faculty development and increased experience teaching online. SN - 1538-9855 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31972846/Self-efficacy_and_Satisfaction_With_Teaching_in_Online_Courses L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/NNE.0000000000000805 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -