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Recent sylvatic yellow fever virus transmission in Brazil: the news from an old disease.
Virol J. 2020 01 23; 17(1):9.VJ

Abstract

Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral disease, affecting humans and non-human primates (NHP), caused by the yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the existence of a safe vaccine, YF continues to cause morbidity and mortality in thousands of people in Africa and South America. Since 2016, massive YF outbreaks have taken place in Brazil, reaching YF-free zones, causing thousands of deaths of humans and NHP. Here we reviewed the main epidemiological aspects, new clinical findings in humans, and issues regarding YFV infection in vectors and NHP in Brazil. The 2016-2019 YF epidemics have been considered the most significant outbreaks of the last 70 years in the country, and the number of human cases was 2.8 times higher than total cases in the previous 36 years. A new YFV lineage was associated with the recent outbreaks, with persistent circulation in Southeast Brazil until 2019. Due to the high number of infected patients, it was possible to evaluate severity and death predictors and new clinical features of YF. Haemagogus janthinomys and Haemagogus leucocelaenus were considered the primary vectors during the outbreaks, and no human case suggested the occurrence of the urban transmission cycle. YFV was detected in a variety of NHP specimens presenting viscerotropic disease, similar to that described experimentally. Further studies regarding NHP sensitivity to YFV, YF pathogenesis, and the duration of the immune response in NHP could contribute to YF surveillance, control, and future strategies for NHP conservation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratório de Vírus, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.Laboratório de Vírus, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.Laboratório de Vírus, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.Laboratório de Vírus, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil.Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, USA.Laboratoire des Interactions Virus-Hôtes, Institut Pasteur de la Guyane, Cayenne, French Guiana.Laboratório de Vírus, Departamento de Microbiologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. betaniadrumond@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31973727

Citation

Silva, Natalia Ingrid Oliveira, et al. "Recent Sylvatic Yellow Fever Virus Transmission in Brazil: the News From an Old Disease." Virology Journal, vol. 17, no. 1, 2020, p. 9.
Silva NIO, Sacchetto L, de Rezende IM, et al. Recent sylvatic yellow fever virus transmission in Brazil: the news from an old disease. Virol J. 2020;17(1):9.
Silva, N. I. O., Sacchetto, L., de Rezende, I. M., Trindade, G. S., LaBeaud, A. D., de Thoisy, B., & Drumond, B. P. (2020). Recent sylvatic yellow fever virus transmission in Brazil: the news from an old disease. Virology Journal, 17(1), 9. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12985-019-1277-7
Silva NIO, et al. Recent Sylvatic Yellow Fever Virus Transmission in Brazil: the News From an Old Disease. Virol J. 2020 01 23;17(1):9. PubMed PMID: 31973727.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Recent sylvatic yellow fever virus transmission in Brazil: the news from an old disease. AU - Silva,Natalia Ingrid Oliveira, AU - Sacchetto,Lívia, AU - de Rezende,Izabela Maurício, AU - Trindade,Giliane de Souza, AU - LaBeaud,Angelle Desiree, AU - de Thoisy,Benoit, AU - Drumond,Betânia Paiva, Y1 - 2020/01/23/ PY - 2019/08/29/received PY - 2019/12/27/accepted PY - 2020/1/25/entrez PY - 2020/1/25/pubmed PY - 2020/7/24/medline KW - Arbovirus KW - Epidemiology KW - Epizootic KW - Flavivirus KW - Non-human primate KW - Outbreak KW - Pathogenesis KW - Vector KW - Yellow fever KW - Yellow fever virus SP - 9 EP - 9 JF - Virology journal JO - Virol J VL - 17 IS - 1 N2 - Yellow fever (YF) is an acute viral disease, affecting humans and non-human primates (NHP), caused by the yellow fever virus (YFV). Despite the existence of a safe vaccine, YF continues to cause morbidity and mortality in thousands of people in Africa and South America. Since 2016, massive YF outbreaks have taken place in Brazil, reaching YF-free zones, causing thousands of deaths of humans and NHP. Here we reviewed the main epidemiological aspects, new clinical findings in humans, and issues regarding YFV infection in vectors and NHP in Brazil. The 2016-2019 YF epidemics have been considered the most significant outbreaks of the last 70 years in the country, and the number of human cases was 2.8 times higher than total cases in the previous 36 years. A new YFV lineage was associated with the recent outbreaks, with persistent circulation in Southeast Brazil until 2019. Due to the high number of infected patients, it was possible to evaluate severity and death predictors and new clinical features of YF. Haemagogus janthinomys and Haemagogus leucocelaenus were considered the primary vectors during the outbreaks, and no human case suggested the occurrence of the urban transmission cycle. YFV was detected in a variety of NHP specimens presenting viscerotropic disease, similar to that described experimentally. Further studies regarding NHP sensitivity to YFV, YF pathogenesis, and the duration of the immune response in NHP could contribute to YF surveillance, control, and future strategies for NHP conservation. SN - 1743-422X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31973727/Recent_sylvatic_yellow_fever_virus_transmission_in_Brazil:_the_news_from_an_old_disease_ L2 - https://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12985-019-1277-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -