Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Metabolic Acidosis in Preterm Infants is Associated with a Longer Length of Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.
Pharmacoecon Open. 2020 Jan 23 [Online ahead of print]PO

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Preterm births account for disproportionately high healthcare costs, in large part due to expenses related to length of stay in the hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It is common for preterm infants to receive human milk fortifier (HMF) while in the NICU. Liquid HMF is available in both acidified and non-acidified formulations. A recent randomized clinical trial found that acidified HMF is associated with an increased incidence of metabolic acidosis, which may contribute to increased costs and longer NICU length of stay.

OBJECTIVE

The present study is a secondary analysis of these data, seeking to determine whether additional factors contribute to metabolic acidosis, whether metabolic acidosis is associated with longer hospital length of stay, and whether these associations contribute to the burden of hospital costs.

METHODS

The study sample consisted of 152 infants who were hospitalized in US NICUs. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the NICU length of stay. Data from the 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) were used to calculate the average cost (charge) per day in a NICU. Costs (charges) were adjusted to $US, year 2018 values, using the health Consumer Price Index.

RESULT

Results indicated that acidified HMF was a strong predictor of metabolic acidosis, more so than gestational age or birth weight. Furthermore, metabolic acidosis was associated with incremental NICU costs (charges) of $US19,002 ($US65,462) per infant and longer NICU LOS.

CONCLUSION

Future studies should further investigate factors that contribute to NICU length of stay and associated costs of care.

TRIAL REGISTRATION

ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02307760.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Abbott Nutrition R&D, Bldg ES1 East, 2900 Easton Square Place, Columbus, OH, USA.Abbott Nutrition R&D, Bldg ES1 East, 2900 Easton Square Place, Columbus, OH, USA.Abbott Nutrition R&D, Bldg ES1 East, 2900 Easton Square Place, Columbus, OH, USA. bridget.barrettreis@abbott.com.Pediatrix Medical Group, North Central Baptist Hospital, San Antonio, TX, USA.Indegene, Tardeo, Mumbai, India.Indegene, Tardeo, Mumbai, India.Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Cohen Children's Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31975350

Citation

Paul, Marika, et al. "Metabolic Acidosis in Preterm Infants Is Associated With a Longer Length of Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit." PharmacoEconomics - Open, 2020.
Paul M, Partridge J, Barrett-Reis B, et al. Metabolic Acidosis in Preterm Infants is Associated with a Longer Length of Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Pharmacoecon Open. 2020.
Paul, M., Partridge, J., Barrett-Reis, B., Ahmad, K. A., Machiraju, P., Jayapalan, H., & Schanler, R. J. (2020). Metabolic Acidosis in Preterm Infants is Associated with a Longer Length of Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. PharmacoEconomics - Open. https://doi.org/10.1007/s41669-020-00194-y
Paul M, et al. Metabolic Acidosis in Preterm Infants Is Associated With a Longer Length of Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Pharmacoecon Open. 2020 Jan 23; PubMed PMID: 31975350.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic Acidosis in Preterm Infants is Associated with a Longer Length of Stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. AU - Paul,Marika, AU - Partridge,Jamie, AU - Barrett-Reis,Bridget, AU - Ahmad,Kaashif A, AU - Machiraju,Pattabhi, AU - Jayapalan,Hemalatha, AU - Schanler,Richard J, Y1 - 2020/01/23/ PY - 2020/1/25/entrez JF - PharmacoEconomics - open JO - Pharmacoecon Open N2 - INTRODUCTION: Preterm births account for disproportionately high healthcare costs, in large part due to expenses related to length of stay in the hospital neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). It is common for preterm infants to receive human milk fortifier (HMF) while in the NICU. Liquid HMF is available in both acidified and non-acidified formulations. A recent randomized clinical trial found that acidified HMF is associated with an increased incidence of metabolic acidosis, which may contribute to increased costs and longer NICU length of stay. OBJECTIVE: The present study is a secondary analysis of these data, seeking to determine whether additional factors contribute to metabolic acidosis, whether metabolic acidosis is associated with longer hospital length of stay, and whether these associations contribute to the burden of hospital costs. METHODS: The study sample consisted of 152 infants who were hospitalized in US NICUs. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the NICU length of stay. Data from the 2012 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Kids' Inpatient Database (KID) were used to calculate the average cost (charge) per day in a NICU. Costs (charges) were adjusted to $US, year 2018 values, using the health Consumer Price Index. RESULT: Results indicated that acidified HMF was a strong predictor of metabolic acidosis, more so than gestational age or birth weight. Furthermore, metabolic acidosis was associated with incremental NICU costs (charges) of $US19,002 ($US65,462) per infant and longer NICU LOS. CONCLUSION: Future studies should further investigate factors that contribute to NICU length of stay and associated costs of care. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02307760. SN - 2509-4254 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31975350/Metabolic_Acidosis_in_Preterm_Infants_is_Associated_with_a_Longer_Length_of_Stay_in_the_Neonatal_Intensive_Care_Unit L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s41669-020-00194-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
Try the Free App:
Prime PubMed app for iOS iPhone iPad
Prime PubMed app for Android
Prime PubMed is provided
free to individuals by:
Unbound Medicine.