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Effects of Dance/Movement Training vs. Aerobic Exercise Training on cognition, physical fitness and quality of life in older adults: A randomized controlled trial.
J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2020 Jan; 24(1):212-220.JB

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

It is generally accepted that physical activity promotes healthy aging. Recent studies suggest dance could also benefit cognition and physical health in seniors, but many styles and approaches of dance exist and rigorous designs for intervention studies are still scarce. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Dance/Movement Training (DMT) to Aerobic Exercise Training (AET) on cognition, physical fitness and health-related quality of life in healthy inactive elderly.

METHODS

A single-center, randomized, parallel assignment, open label trial was conducted with 62 older adults (mean age = 67.48 ± 5.37 years) recruited from the community. Participants were randomly assigned to a 12-week (3x/week, 1hr/session) DMT program, AET program or control group. Cognitive functioning, physical fitness and health-related quality of life were assessed at baseline (T-0), and post-training (T-12 weeks).

RESULTS

41 participants completed the study. Executive and non-executive composite scores showed a significant increase post-training (F(1,37) = 4.35, p = .04; F(1,37) = 7.01, p = .01). Cardiovascular fitness improvements were specific to the AET group (F(2,38) = 16.40, p < .001) while mobility improvements were not group-dependent (10 m walk: F(1,38) = 11.67, p = .002; Timed up and go: F(1,38) = 22.07, p < .001).

CONCLUSIONS

Results suggest that DMT may have a positive impact on cognition and physical functioning in older adults however further research is needed. This study could serve as a model for designing future RCTs with dance-related interventions. REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials. gov Identifier NCT02455258.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Institut Universitaire sur La Réadaptation en Déficience Physique de Montréal, Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Rehabilitation of Greater Montreal, Montreal, Canada.Research Centre, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Canada; Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.School of Rehabilitation, Faculty of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université Du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada.Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Sports Studies, Bishop's University, Sherbrooke, Canada.Department of Psychology, Université Du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Research Centre, Institut Universitaire en Santé Mentale de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Exercise Science, Université Du Québec à Montréal, Montreal, Canada.Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Psychology, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Centre Hospitalier de L'Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada.Research Centre, Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Canada; Research Centre, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; Department of Medicine, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Canada; PERFORM Centre and Department of Psychology, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada. Electronic address: louis.bherer@umontreal.ca.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

31987547

Citation

Esmail, Alida, et al. "Effects of Dance/Movement Training Vs. Aerobic Exercise Training On Cognition, Physical Fitness and Quality of Life in Older Adults: a Randomized Controlled Trial." Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, vol. 24, no. 1, 2020, pp. 212-220.
Esmail A, Vrinceanu T, Lussier M, et al. Effects of Dance/Movement Training vs. Aerobic Exercise Training on cognition, physical fitness and quality of life in older adults: A randomized controlled trial. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2020;24(1):212-220.
Esmail, A., Vrinceanu, T., Lussier, M., Predovan, D., Berryman, N., Houle, J., Karelis, A., Grenier, S., Minh Vu, T. T., Villalpando, J. M., & Bherer, L. (2020). Effects of Dance/Movement Training vs. Aerobic Exercise Training on cognition, physical fitness and quality of life in older adults: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, 24(1), 212-220. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbmt.2019.05.004
Esmail A, et al. Effects of Dance/Movement Training Vs. Aerobic Exercise Training On Cognition, Physical Fitness and Quality of Life in Older Adults: a Randomized Controlled Trial. J Bodyw Mov Ther. 2020;24(1):212-220. PubMed PMID: 31987547.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of Dance/Movement Training vs. Aerobic Exercise Training on cognition, physical fitness and quality of life in older adults: A randomized controlled trial. AU - Esmail,Alida, AU - Vrinceanu,Tudor, AU - Lussier,Maxime, AU - Predovan,David, AU - Berryman,Nicolas, AU - Houle,Janie, AU - Karelis,Antony, AU - Grenier,Sébastien, AU - Minh Vu,Thien Tuong, AU - Villalpando,Juan Manuel, AU - Bherer,Louis, Y1 - 2019/05/07/ PY - 2019/04/30/received PY - 2019/05/04/accepted PY - 2020/1/29/entrez PY - 2020/1/29/pubmed PY - 2021/4/23/medline KW - Cardiovascular fitness KW - Executive functions KW - Mobility KW - Prevention KW - Quality of life SP - 212 EP - 220 JF - Journal of bodywork and movement therapies JO - J Bodyw Mov Ther VL - 24 IS - 1 N2 - INTRODUCTION: It is generally accepted that physical activity promotes healthy aging. Recent studies suggest dance could also benefit cognition and physical health in seniors, but many styles and approaches of dance exist and rigorous designs for intervention studies are still scarce. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of Dance/Movement Training (DMT) to Aerobic Exercise Training (AET) on cognition, physical fitness and health-related quality of life in healthy inactive elderly. METHODS: A single-center, randomized, parallel assignment, open label trial was conducted with 62 older adults (mean age = 67.48 ± 5.37 years) recruited from the community. Participants were randomly assigned to a 12-week (3x/week, 1hr/session) DMT program, AET program or control group. Cognitive functioning, physical fitness and health-related quality of life were assessed at baseline (T-0), and post-training (T-12 weeks). RESULTS: 41 participants completed the study. Executive and non-executive composite scores showed a significant increase post-training (F(1,37) = 4.35, p = .04; F(1,37) = 7.01, p = .01). Cardiovascular fitness improvements were specific to the AET group (F(2,38) = 16.40, p < .001) while mobility improvements were not group-dependent (10 m walk: F(1,38) = 11.67, p = .002; Timed up and go: F(1,38) = 22.07, p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that DMT may have a positive impact on cognition and physical functioning in older adults however further research is needed. This study could serve as a model for designing future RCTs with dance-related interventions. REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials. gov Identifier NCT02455258. SN - 1532-9283 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/31987547/Effects_of_Dance/Movement_Training_vs__Aerobic_Exercise_Training_on_cognition_physical_fitness_and_quality_of_life_in_older_adults:_A_randomized_controlled_trial_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1360-8592(19)30178-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -